Japanese  
  Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Chemistry > Controlling Quantum Tunneling with Light… >
Controlling Quantum Tunneling with Light

Published: April 5, 2012.
By University of Cambridge
http://www.cam.ac.uk

Scientists at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge have used light to help push electrons through a classically impenetrable barrier. While quantum tunnelling is at the heart of the peculiar wave nature of particles, this is the first time that it has been controlled by light. Their research is published today, 05 April, in the journal Science.

Particles cannot normally pass through walls, but if they are small enough quantum mechanics says that it can happen. This occurs during the production of radioactive decay and in many chemical reactions as well as in scanning tunnelling microscopes.

According to team leader, Professor Jeremy Baumberg, "the trick to telling electrons how to pass through walls, is to now marry them with light".

This marriage is fated because the light is in the form of cavity photons, packets of light trapped to bounce back and forth between mirrors which sandwich the electrons oscillating through their wall.

Research scientist Peter Cristofolini added: "The offspring of this marriage are actually new indivisible particles, made of both light and matter, which disappear through the slab-like walls of semiconductor at will."

One of the features of these new particles, which the team christened 'dipolaritons', is that they are stretched out in a specific direction rather like a bar magnet. And just like magnets, they feel extremely strong forces between each other.

Such strongly interacting particles are behind a whole slew of recent interest from semiconductor physicists who are trying to make condensates, the equivalent of superconductors and superfluids that travel without loss, in semiconductors.

Being in two places at once, these new electronic particles hold the promise of transferring ideas from atomic physics into practical devices, using quantum mechanics visible to the eye.




Show Reference »


Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


 
This is form to send feedback to the editors. Tell us what you think about this article. All comments are not published. If you are looking for a response to a question please use our another feedback page.
Related »

Pan 
11/21/11 
UGA Scientists Invent Long-lasting, Near Infrared-emitting Material
By University of Georgia
Materials that emit visible light after being exposed to sunlight are commonplace and can be found in everything from emergency signage to glow-in-the-dark stickers. But until now, scientists have …
Interface 
4/14/14 

Novel Technique Developed by NUS Scientists Opens Door to Better Solar Cells
By National University of Singapore
Electrons 
6/24/10 

How the First Step Affects the (watery) Result
By Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Bender 
11/5/11 
Unique Bipolar Compounds Enhance Functionality of Organic Electronics
By University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering
Researchers often work with a narrow range of compounds when making organic electronics, such as solar panels, light emitting diodes and transistors. Professor Tim Bender and Ph.D. Candidate Graham …
Aromatic 
12/18/12 
★ 
A New Breed of Stable Anti-aromatic Compound
By University of Texas at Austin
AUSTIN, Texas – By synthesizing a stable "antiaromatic" compound, as well as a never before seen intermediate version of that compound, chemists at The University of Texas at Austin …
More » 
 
ScienceNewsline  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese Edition
The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program. All contents are copyright of their owners except U.S. Government works. U.S. Government works are assumed to be in the public domain unless otherwise noted. Everything else copyright ScienceNewsline.