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Top > Chemistry > Glowing DNA Invention Points Towards… >
Glowing DNA Invention Points Towards High Speed Disease Detection

Published: October 9, 2012.
By University of Copenhagen
http://www.ku.dk

"When we started working on the probe, I just wanted to develop a fast and cheap method for detecting plant miRNAs", explains Seong Wook Yang, and Vosch continues, "For years I had been making and studying luminous Silver Nano Clusters formed in DNA. Coupling that with Yang's intimate knowledge of the inner workings of miRNA and the rest of his biological toolboxes turned out extremely fruitful", concludes Vosch.

Links to publications:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn302633q
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ac201903n



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