Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Biology > New Understanding of Nerve Damage… >

New Understanding of Nerve Damage Caused by Spinal Cord Injury Could Improve Treatment Design

Published: January 3, 2013.
Released by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News  

New Rochelle, NY, January 3, 2013—More than half of traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCI) in humans are cervical lesions, resulting in chronic loss of limb function. A better understanding of the link between the neurologic damage caused by SCI, spontaneous motor function recovery, and long-term motor deficits would lead to better therapeutic approaches, as discussed in an article in Journal of Neurotrauma, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Neurotrauma website at http://www.liebertpub.com/neu.

About 70% of human traumatic SCIs are incomplete, but the destruction of critical nerve fibers disrupts the signals normally sent between the brain and spinal cord beyond the site of the injury, resulting in locomotor impairment and paralysis. Elisa López-Dolado, Ana Lucas-Osma, and Jorge Collazos-Castro, Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos Finca La Peraleda, Toledo, Spain, simulated a C6 partial SCI in adult rats and analyzed their recovery of motor function over four months.

The authors report extensive kinetic, anatomical, and electrophysiological data that demonstrate how the animals compensate for the permanent loss of some motor function. In the article "Dynamic Motor Compensations with Permanent, Focal Loss of Forelimb Force after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury," they propose that a premotoneuronal system in the cervical spine may be involved in the production and chronic nature of limb impairment, which could have important implications for the design of future treatment methods.

"This paper is important to the spinal cord injury field because it provides a comprehensive assessment of motor performance up to four months after cervical spinal cord injury," says Deputy Editor of Journal of Neurotrauma W. Dalton Dietrich, III, PhD, Scientific Director, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, and Kinetic Concepts Distinguished Chair in Neurosurgery, Professor of Neurological Surgery, Neurology and Cell Biology at University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Lois Pope LIFE Center. "Force and kinematic data identifying progressive sensorimotor compensatory processes indicate new targets for therapeutic strategies to promote recovery and repair."




The above story is based on materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News.

Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


comments powered by Disqus


Related »

Locomotion 
8/14/14 

Bypass Commands from the Brain to Legs Through a Computer
Cord 
11/14/10 

Research Uncovers Extensive Natural Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury
Spinal 
8/5/14 
★★★ 

Vanderbilt Finding May Aid Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury
Recovery 
12/19/14 
Trigger Mechanism for Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury Revealed
After an incomplete spinal cord injury, the body can partially recover basic motor function. So-called muscle spindles and associated sensory circuits back to the spinal cord promote the establishment …
Neural 
4/11/13 
Restoring Paretic Hand Function Via an Artificial Neural Connection Bridging Spinal Cord Injury
Functional loss of limb control in individuals with spinal cord injury or stroke can be caused by interruption of the neural pathways between brain and spinal cord, although the …
Spinal 
11/21/13 

MU Research Sheds Light on Nerve Regeneration Following Spinal Cord Injury
Spinal 
7/2/13 
★★ 
Irreversible Tissue Loss Seen Within 40 Days of Spinal Cord Injury
A spinal cord injury changes the functional state and structure of the spinal cord and the brain. For example, the patients' ability to walk or move their hands can …
Electrical 
9/24/14 
From Rats to Humans: Project NEUWalk Closer to Clinical Trials
Lausanne, Switzerland. EPFL scientists have discovered how to control the limbs of a completely paralyzed rat in real time to help it walk again. Their results are published today …
Spinal 
9/16/14 
Give Progesterone a Chance
There is currently no standard pharmacological treatment for spinal cord injury. Here, Dr. Florencia Labombarda, who comes from Buenos Aires University, Argentina suggests that progesterone, a steroid hormone, may …
More » 
 
© Newsline Group  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile