Japanese  
  Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care > Triple Mix of Blood Pressure… >
Triple Mix of Blood Pressure Drugs And Painkillers Linked to Kidney Problems

Published: January 9, 2013.
By BMJ-British Medical Journal
http://www.bma.org

Patients who take a triple combination of blood pressure drugs and common painkillers are at an increased risk of serious kidney problems, especially at the start of treatment, finds a study published on bmj.com today.

Although the absolute risk for individuals is low, it is still something doctors and patients should be aware of, say the researchers.

Acute kidney injury (also known as kidney failure) is a major public health concern. It occurs in more than 20% of hospital inpatients and is associated with around half of all potentially preventable deaths in hospital. It is often triggered by adverse reactions to drugs, but little is known about the safety of different drug combinations.

So a team of researchers from the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University in Montreal, Canada, set out to assess whether certain combinations of drugs to lower blood pressure (antihypertensive drugs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are linked to an increased risk of kidney injury.

These drugs are commonly prescribed together, particularly in elderly people with several long term conditions.

Using the world's largest computerised database of primary care records (CPRD), they identified 487,372 people who received antihypertensive drugs between 1997 and 2008. Drugs included angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and diuretics, with NSAIDs.

Patients were tracked for nearly six years, during which time 2,215 were diagnosed with acute kidney injury that prompted admission to hospital or dialysis (7 in 10,000 person years).

The results show that patients taking a double therapy combination of either a diuretic or an ACE inhibitors or ARB with an NSAID were at no increased risk of kidney injury. However, a triple therapy combination of a diuretic with an ACE inhibitor or ARB and an NSAID was associated with a 31% higher rate of kidney injury, particularly elevated in the first 30 days of treatment during which it was 82% higher.

These results remained consistent after adjusting for confounding factors and controlling for other potential sources of bias.

The authors conclude that, "although antihypertensive drugs have cardiovascular benefits, vigilance may be warranted when they are used concurrently with NSAIDs." They add: "In particular, major attention should be paid early in the course of treatment, and a more appropriate choice among the available anti-inflammatory or analgesic drugs could therefore be applied in clinical practice."

In an accompanying editorial, researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine say this study "is an important step in the right direction" but "probably underestimates the true burden of drug associated acute kidney injury."

They suggest that clinicians advise patients of the risks and be vigilant for drug associated acute kidney injury, and say "the jury is still out on whether double drug combinations are indeed safe."


Show Reference »


Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


 
This is form to send feedback to the editors. Tell us what you think about this article. All comments are not published. If you are looking for a response to a question please use our another feedback page.
Related »

Medication 
1/13/11 
A Pounding Heart May Be Dangerous for Some Kidney Patients
By American Society of Nephrology
Among older adults with a recent heart attack (myocardial infarction), those with lower levels of kidney function are less likely to take their medications as prescribed, according to a …
Patients 
1/13/11 
Post-heart Attack, Patients with Lower Kidney Function Not Taking Prescribed Meds
By American Society of Nephrology
Among older adults with a recent heart attack (myocardial infarction), those with lower levels of kidney function are less likely to take their medications as prescribed, according to a …
Patients 
3/10/13 
Drug Protects Against Kidney Injury from Imaging Dye in ACS Patients
By American College of Cardiology
SAN FRANCISCO (March 10, 2013) —High doses of a popular cholesterol-lowering drug significantly reduced the rate of acute kidney injury caused by dye used in imaging in acute coronary …
Kidney 
5/30/13 
Mystery Solved: Why People on Dialysis Have Increased Risk of Heart Attack
By Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Bethesda, MD—Patients with advanced kidney disease who are undergoing hemodialysis are known to be highly susceptible to heart attacks and other cardiovascular complications, and now scientists likely know why. …
Patients 
7/29/13 
NIH Researchers Identify Therapy That May Curb Kidney Deterioration in Patients with Rare Disorder
By National Human Genome Research Institute
A team led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health has overcome a major biological hurdle in an effort to find improved treatments for patients with a rare …
Disease 
10/6/10 
Einstein Researchers Find Osteoporosis Drug May Help Women with Kidney Disease
By Albert Einstein College of Medicine
October 6, 2010 — (BRONX, NY) — The osteoporosis drug raloxifene may be useful in treating kidney disease in women, suggests a new study led by Michal Melamed, M.D., …
Kidney 
7/30/13 
New Definition of Chronic Kidney Disease Labels 1 in 8 Adults as Sick
By BMJ-British Medical Journal
A new definition of chronic kidney disease labels over 1 in 8 adults and around half of people over 70 years of age as having the disease. Yet low …
More » 
 
ScienceNewsline  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese Edition
The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program. All contents are copyright of their owners except U.S. Government works. U.S. Government works are assumed to be in the public domain unless otherwise noted. Everything else copyright ScienceNewsline.