Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care > How Do Happiness And Sadness… >
How Do Happiness And Sadness Circuits Contribute to Bipolar Disorder?

Published: January 14, 2013.
By Elsevier
http://www.elsevier.com

Philadelphia, PA, January 14, 2013 – Bipolar disorder is a severe mood disorder characterized by unpredictable and dramatic mood swings between the highs of mania and lows of depression. These mood episodes occur among periods of 'normal mood', termed euthymia.

Prior research has clearly shown that brain emotion circuitry is dysregulated in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder. It is thought that these disturbances impair one's ability to control emotion and contribute to mood episodes.

Continuing this line of research, the January 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry reports the results of a study conducted by scientists from Indiana University School of Medicine. These investigators used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate which areas of the brain showed abnormal activation while patients in different mood phases of bipolar disorder tried to control their response to emotional and non-emotional material.

This allowed them to analyze brain activation patterns based on patient mood (manic, depressed, or euthymic) and stimuli type (emotion versus no emotion and happy versus sad). Because medication effects on brain activation have been observed in some studies, the researchers recruited only unmedicated volunteers.

They found that bipolar depressed patients abnormally activated brain areas when they had to withhold responses to sad faces. Manic patients, on the other hand, had abnormal activation regardless of whether they were trying to withhold response to sad faces, happy faces or non-emotional material. Even the euthymic bipolar subjects showed abnormal activation of cortical areas of the brain while withholding responses to emotional faces.

These findings suggest that distinct circuit dysfunctions may contribute to different features of emotion dysregulation in bipolar disorder.

Professor and senior author Dr. Amit Anand said, "This study provides important information regarding brain areas that may be important in controlling response to emotional material and the functional abnormalities in these areas in mood disorders."

"It is interesting that subtly different circuits distinguish symptomatic and non-symptomatic patients with bipolar disorder when they are suppressing their happy and sad reactions," commented Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry. "These findings may have implications for the refinement of circuit-based treatments for bipolar disorder including neurostimulation and psychotherapy."


Show Reference »


Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


 
All comments are reviewed before being posted. We cannot accept messages that refer a product, or web site.If you are looking for a response to a question please use our another feedback page.
Related »

Women 
7/16/13 

Distinctive Brain Blood Flow Patterns Associated with Sexual Dysfunction
By Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University
Korenberg 
6/13/12 
★★ 
Hormones, Elvis, And Human Emotion
By University of Utah Health Sciences
(SALT LAKE CITY)—The velvety voice of Elvis Presley still makes hearts flutter—and in a new study with people who have the rare genetic disorder Williams syndrome, one of the …
Mirror 
3/2/12 
Holding a Mirror to Brain Changes in Autism
By Elsevier
Impaired social function is a cardinal symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). One of the brain circuits that enable us to relate to other people is the "mirror neuron" …
Recognition 
2/26/13 
Face Values: Ability to Recognize Emotions in Others Impaired by AIDS
By BioMed Central
People with HIV are less able to recognise facial emotion than non-infected people finds a study published in the launch edition of BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Psychology. …
Sexually 
12/2/13 
Critical Brain Areas for Sex Hormone to Induce Diseases
By Neural Regeneration Research
The human brain is anatomically and functionally sexually dimorphic. While specific debates on this topic have occurred for decades, sexual dimorphism is generally acknowledged with respect to brain size, …
Neglect 
1/3/12 
Kessler Foundation Reports Advance in Early Diagnosis of Spatial Neglect After Stroke
By Kessler Foundation
Researchers at Kessler Foundation and Seton Hall University report findings in the early diagnosis of acute spatial neglect, a hidden disability that is a common complication of stroke. In …
More » 
 
© Newsline Group  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese Edition