Japanese  
  Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care > Weight Loss Through the Use… >
Weight Loss Through the Use of Intestinal Barrier Sleeves

Published: October 10, 2013.
By Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health
http://www.gsf.de

Bariatric surgeries, such as a gastric bypass, are currently the most effective anti-obesity therapies. They also lead to a reduced insulin resistance. However, the pitfall of these surgical interventions is that they are highly invasive and often permanent procedures. An international team of scientists led by Dr. Kirk Habegger, Metabolic Disease Institute, University of Cincinnati, and Prof. Dr. Matthias Tschöp, Scientific Director of the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU), Partner of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have now developed an equally efficient but less invasive surgical method, thus paving the way for the development of novel safe and efficient anti-obesity therapies.

In their study, a flexible tube, called a DES (duodenal-endoluminal sleeve), was placed in the small intestine. Tschöp, Habegger, and colleagues observed that this intervention in an animal model potently corrects obesity while improving glucose metabolism. The metabolic benefits of this novel surgical intervention seem to be mediated via reduced nutrient absorption in the intestinal lumen and reactive mucous membrane growth in the other intestinal sections, a shift which may lead to improved nutrient utilization. The intervention carries the great advantage that it is less invasive and removable at any time.

The method is consequently seen as a promising approach to treat obesity and diabetes. Further studies now aim to clarify which influence this novel surgical technique has on the complex neuroendocrine network that controls energy metabolism. The long-term goal based on such better understanding is to optimize devices to the level where they can be used successfully in humans, potentially in combination with hormone based drug therapies. (Also see press release "Enhancing weight loss: Gastric banding with hormone therapy.")

The numerous conditions associated with overweight and obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, are among the major widespread diseases in Germany. They are the focus of the research at the Helmholtz Zentrum München.




Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


 
All comments are reviewed before being posted. We cannot accept messages that refer a product, or web site.If you are looking for a response to a question please use our another feedback page.
Related »

Risk 
6/28/10 
International Study Identifies 12 New Genetic Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes
By Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Centre for Environmental Health
Neuherberg, Düsseldorf, June, 28. 2010. An international consortium including Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Diabetes Center, Düsseldorf has identified 12 new gene variants which impact the individual’s risk …
Dimelli 
9/12/13 
More Than Just Type 1 Or Type 2: DiMelli Study Points to Different Forms of Diabetes
By Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health
The DiMelli (Diabetes Mellitus Incidence Cohort Registry) study examines the frequency and characteristics of diabetes phenotypes in children and young adults below the age of 20. The study was …
Diabetes 
10/30/13 
HDL Cholesterol Controls Blood Glucose
By Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health
Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease rates are markedly increased in individuals with type 2 diabetes. One of the strongest independent predictors of cardiovascular disease in these patients is a low circulating …
Mitofusin 
3/23/12 

Researchers Validate the Potential of a Protein for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes
By Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)
Type 
3/4/13 
BUSM Researchers Use Goal-oriented Therapy to Treat Diabetic Neuropathies
By Boston University Medical Center
(Boston) – Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and VA Boston Healthcare System (VA BHS) have found that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help relieve pain for …
Tolylfluanid 
6/25/12 
Fungicide Used on Farm Crops Linked to Insulin Resistance
By The Endocrine Society
A fungicide used on farm crops can induce insulin resistance, a new tissue-culture study finds, providing another piece of evidence linking environmental pollutants to diabetes. The results will be …
Levels 
12/12/13 
★★★ 
New Study Shows Link Between Perfluorinated Compounds And Diabetes
By Uppsala University
Perfluorinated compounds are environmental toxins that are found in fire extinguishing foam and water-repellent textiles and, for example. In a new study, a research team led from Uppsala University …
Diabetes 
10/22/11 
Study Finds No Correlation Between Primary Kidney Stone Treatment And Diabetes
By Mayo Clinic
A Mayo Clinic study finds no correlation between the use of shock waves to break up kidney stones and the long-term development of diabetes. The study was released Friday …
Diabetes 
11/13/13 
Mayo Clinic: Add Bone Deterioration to Diabetes Complications
By Mayo Clinic
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- The list of complications from type 2 diabetes is long: vascular and heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage, kidney disease, hearing problems and Alzheimer's disease. Physicians …
Diabetes 
6/11/14 
Researchers Uncover Common Heart Drug's Link to Diabetes
By McMaster University
Hamilton, ON (June 11, 2014) - McMaster University researchers may have found a novel way to suppress the devastating side effect of statins, one of the worlds' most widely …
More » 
 
ScienceNewsline  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese Edition
The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program. All contents are copyright of their owners except U.S. Government works. U.S. Government works are assumed to be in the public domain unless otherwise noted. Everything else copyright ScienceNewsline.