Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care > Stomach Cells Naturally Revert to… >

Stomach Cells Naturally Revert to Stem Cells

Published: October 10, 2013.
Released by Washington University School of Medicine  

New research has shown that the stomach naturally produces more stem cells than previously realized, likely for repair of injuries from infections, digestive fluids and the foods we eat.

Stem cells can make multiple kinds of specialized cells, and scientists have been working for years to use that ability to repair injuries throughout the body. But causing specialized adult cells to revert to stem cells and work on repairs has been challenging.

Scientists from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Utrecht Medical Center in the Netherlands report in the new study that a class of specialized cells in the stomach reverts to stem cells more often than they thought.

"We already knew that these cells, which are called chief cells, can change back into stem cells to make temporary repairs in significant stomach injuries, such as a cut or damage from infection," said Jason Mills, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at Washington University. "The fact that they're making this transition more often, even in the absence of noticeable injuries, suggests that it may be easier than we realized to make some types of mature, specialized adult cells revert to stem cells."

The findings are published Oct. 10 in Cell.

Chief cells normally produce digestive fluids for the stomach. Mills studies their transformation into stem cells for injury repair. He also is investigating the possibility that the potential for growth unleashed by this change may contribute to stomach cancers.

In the new report, Mills, graduate student Greg Sibbel and Hans Clevers, MD, PhD, a geneticist at Utrecht Medical Center, identify markers that show a small number of chief cells become stem cells even in the absence of serious injury.

If a significant injury is introduced in cell cultures or in animal models, more chief cells become stem cells, making it possible to fix the damage.

"Chief cells normally are big factories with elaborate networks of tubing and secretory mechanisms for making and secreting digestive juices," said Mills, the associate director of Washington University's Digestive Diseases Center. "That all has to be dismantled and recycled so the chief cell can become a stem cell. It's a remarkable change."

Mills' other goals include learning if the chief cells' transformations are triggered by signals sent by injured tissue, by damage sensors on the chief cells or by some combination of these methods.




The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University School of Medicine.

Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


comments powered by Disqus


Related »

Cells 
5/3/12 
Study Reveals Dynamic Changes in Gene Regulation in Human Stem Cells
LA JOLLA, CA – May 3, 2012 – A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and …
Cells 
6/30/14 
Stem Cells May Be More Widespread And with Greater Potential Than Previously Believed
With the plethora of research and published studies on stem cells over the last decade, many would say that …
Cells 
7/31/13 
★★★ 
Stem Cells in Urine Easy to Isolate And Have Potential for Numerous Therapies
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – July 31, 2013 – Could harvesting stem cells for therapy one day be as simple as …
Culture 
2/26/15 
Culture Clash: How Stem Cells Are Grown Affects Their Genetic Stability
The therapeutic promise of human stem cells is indisputably huge, but the process of translating their potential into effective, …
Stem 
4/26/11 

Scientists Create Stable, Self-renewing Neural Stem Cells
Bacteria 
1/17/13 
Bacteria's Hidden Skill Could Pave Way for Stem Cell Treatments
A discovery about the way in which bugs spread throughout the body could help to develop stem cell treatments. …
Stem 
2/11/15 
New Reporter System to Study Bone-related Regenerative Medicine Generated by UMN Labs
MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (2/10/2015) - A new reporter system used to study the bone regeneration potential of human embryonic stem …
More » 
 
© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile