Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Chemistry > Countdown to Zero: New 'Zero-dimensional'… >
Countdown to Zero: New 'Zero-dimensional' Carbon Nanotube May Lead to Superthin Electronics And Synt

Published: December 11, 2013.
By University of Pittsburgh
http://www.pitt.edu

PITTSBURGH (December 9, 2013) … Synthetic, man-made cells and ultrathin electronics built from a new form of "zero-dimensional" carbon nanotube may be possible through research at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering. The research, ""Zero-Dimensional" Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes," was published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

Principal investigators are Steven R. Little, PhD, associate professor, CNG Faculty Fellow and Chair of the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; and Anna C. Balazs, PhD, the Distinguished Robert v. d. Luft Professor of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering.

Co-investigators include Riccardo Gottardi, PhD, Ri.MED Foundation Fellow, whose research focuses on nanotechnology and biomedical engineering; Alexander Star, PhD, associate professor of chemistry; Bhaskar Godugu, PhD, research assistant professor and director of Pitt's mass spectrometry facility; Susheng Tan, PhD, research assistant professor; postdoctoral researchers Yanan Chen, PhD and Kaladhar Kamalasanan, PhD; and Sam Rothstein, PhD, CSO and co-founder of Qrono Inc.

"Since its discovery, carbon nanotubes have held the promise to revolutionize the field of electronics, material science and even medicine," says Dr. Little. "Zero-dimensional carbon nanotubes present the possibility to build ultrathin, superfast electronic devices, far superior to the best existing ones and it could be possible to build strong and ultralight cars, bridges, and airplanes."

One of the most difficult hurdles is processing the carbon nanotubes into smaller forms. However, previous research at Pitt has managed to cut the carbon nanotubes into the smallest dimensions ever to overcome this problem.

"We have confirmed that these shorter nanotubes are more dispersible and potentially easier to process for industrial as well as biomedical application, and could even constitute the building blocks for the creation of synthetic cells," says Dr. Gottardi.

The organization of the atoms within nanotubes makes them particularly interesting materials to work with. However, they are barely soluble, making industrial processing difficult. One aspect of the team's research will focus on creating more soluble and therefore more usable carbon nanotubes. These shorter nanotubes have the same dimensions as many proteins that compose the basic machinery of living cells, presenting the potential for cell or protein-level biomedical imaging, protein or nucleic acid vaccination carriers, drug delivery vehicles, or even components of synthetic cells.

Overall, the project is aimed at developing and working with these more dispersible carbon nanotubes with the aim of making them easier to process. The creation of the smaller nanotubes is the first step toward reaching this goal.




Translate this page: Chinese French German Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Russian Spanish


Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the ScienceNewsline.
Related »

Imaging 
11/16/10 
Imaging Tool May Aid Nanoelectronics by Screening Tiny Tubes
By Purdue University
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Researchers have demonstrated a new imaging tool for rapidly screening structures called single-wall carbon nanotubes, possibly hastening their use in creating a new class of …
Materials 
2/7/11 
Taming Carbon Nanotubes
By University of Gothenburg
Carbon nanotubes have many attractive properties, and their structure and areas of application can be compared with those of graphene, the material for whose discovery the most recent Nobel …
Cells 
12/6/11 
'Label-free' Imaging Tool Tracks Nanotubes in Cells, Blood for Biomedical Research
By Purdue University
Researchers have demonstrated a new imaging tool for tracking structures called carbon nanotubes in living cells and the bloodstream, which could aid efforts to perfect their use in biomedical …
Nanotubes 
7/14/10 
Nanotubes Pass Acid Test
By Rice University
HOUSTON – (July 14, 2010) – Rice University scientists have found the "ultimate" solvent for all kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a breakthrough that brings the creation of a …
Martí 
5/3/13 
'Going Negative' Pays for Nanotubes
By Rice University
A Rice University laboratory's cagey strategy turns negatively charged carbon nanotubes into liquid crystals that could enhance the creation of fibers and films. …
Complexes 
2/23/11 
Metallic Molecules to Nanotubes: Spread Out!
By Rice University
HOUSTON -- (Feb. 23, 2011) -- A lab at Rice University has stepped forward with an efficient method to disperse nanotubes in a way that preserves their unique properties …
More » 

Most Popular - Physics & Chemistryi »
AWARDS »
RNA Shows Potential as Boiling-resistant Anionic Polymer Material for Nanoarchitectures
GRAPHENE »
Nanomaterial Outsmarts Ions
HYDROGEN »
Nanoreporters Tell 'Sour' Oil from 'Sweet'
Scientists at Rice University have created a nanoscale detector that checks for and reports on the presence of hydrogen sulfide in crude oil and natural gas while they're still …
BONES »
Vacuum Ultraviolet Lamp of the Future Created in Japan
WASHINGTON D.C., April 22, 2014 -- A team of researchers in Japan has developed a solid-state lamp that emits high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light at the shortest wavelengths ever recorded …
VIDEO »
Cannabis Chemistry: How Scientists Test Pot for Potency And Safety (video)
ScienceNewsline  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese
The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program. All contents are copyright of their owners except U.S. Government works. U.S. Government works are assumed to be in the public domain unless otherwise noted. Everything else copyright ScienceNewsline.