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Medicine & Health »RSS
Researchers Identify How Humans Can Develop Immunity to Deadly Marburg Virus

Yesterday − University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University and The Scripps Research Institute have identified mechanisms involved in antibody response to the deadly Marburg virus by studying the blood of a Marburg survivor. This study now appears online and will be in the Feb. 26 edition of Cell. Using blood samples from a Marburg survivor, the researchers were able to determine how…
• Strong Connection Between Violence And Mental Illness During Guatemala Civil War − Yesterday
• The Numbers Are In: 1.8 Millions Australian Smokers Likely to Die from Their Habit − Yesterday
• Synthetic Biology Breakthrough Leads to Cheaper Statin Production − Yesterday
• New Approach to Assessing Effectiveness of Anti-cancer Drugs − Yesterday
• Women Veterans Younger, More Depressed When Referred for Heart Test − Yesterday
• Study: High Stress for New Mothers Increases Secondhand Smoke Risk for Infants − Yesterday
• A Study Relates the Level of Pollutants Accumulated in the Body with Obesity Levels − Yesterday
• Feast-and-famine Diet Could Extend Life, Study Shows − Yesterday
More »

Most Popular »
1
02-26-15

More Than 2 Hours of TV a Day Increases High Blood Pressure Risk in Children by 30 Percent

2
02-26-15

Early Signs in Young Children Predict Type 1 Diabetes
New research shows that it is possible to predict the development of type 1 diabetes. By measuring the presence of autoantibodies in the blood, it is possible to detect…
3
02-26-15

Cystic Fibrosis Discovery May Lead to New Treatment Strategy, Help Patients Breathe Easier
A team led by UC San Francisco professor of medicine John Fahy, MD, has discovered why mucus in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is thick, sticky…
4
02-26-15

Researchers Demonstrate Optogenetic Stimulation of the Brain to Control Pain

5
02-25-15

UGA Researchers Discover Potential Treatment for Drug-resistant Tuberculosis

6
02-26-15

Study Shows Troubling Rise in Use of Animals in Experiments
Washington -- Despite industry claims of reduced animal use as well as federal laws and policies aimed at reducing the use of animals, the number of animals used in…
7
02-27-15

Women Veterans Younger, More Depressed When Referred for Heart Test
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Women veterans who had specialized heart tests were younger and more likely to be obese, depressed and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder than men veterans,…
8
02-27-15

Study: High Stress for New Mothers Increases Secondhand Smoke Risk for Infants

9
02-27-15

Strong Connection Between Violence And Mental Illness During Guatemala Civil War
PHILADELPHIA--Violence during the civil war in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 resulted in the development of significant mental health problems and conditions for the county's people, according to a…
10
02-26-15

Researchers Find Link Between Inflammation, Tissue Regeneration And Wound Repair Response
Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair…
11
02-27-15

The Numbers Are In: 1.8 Millions Australian Smokers Likely to Die from Their Habit
The research, published today in the international journal BMC Medicine, is an important reminder about the extreme hazards of smoking. "While Australia is a world leader in tobacco…
12
02-27-15

New Approach to Assessing Effectiveness of Anti-cancer Drugs
Manchester scientists have a developed a new method to monitor the effect of anti-cancer drugs on very rare leukaemia stem cells. The approach potentially allows doctors to screen patients…
13
02-26-15

Marshaling the Body's Own Weapons Against Psoriasis
A three-character code brings relief to patients with psoriasis and sheds light on complex immunoregulation processes: IL-4, an abbreviation for the endogenous signaling molecule Interleukin 4. The substance's ability…
14
02-27-15

A Study Relates the Level of Pollutants Accumulated in the Body with Obesity Levels

More » 
Cancer, Oncology
The Numbers Are In: 1.8 Millions Australian Smokers Likely to Die from Their Habit

Yesterday − University of Melbourne
The research, published today in the international journal BMC Medicine, is an important reminder about the extreme hazards of smoking. "While Australia is a world leader in tobacco control, the battle to reduce the public health consequences of tobacco use is far from over," Laureate Professor Alan Lopez, Director, of the Global Burden of Disease Group, University of Melbourne said. …
• New Approach to Assessing Effectiveness of Anti-cancer Drugs − Yesterday
• Gene Discovery Sheds Light on Causes of Rare Type of Dwarfism − Yesterday
• A New Ultrasensitive Test for Peanut Allergies − Yesterday
• Urine Test Could Lead to Better Treatment of Bladder Cancer − Yesterday
• The Lancet Hematology: Experts Warn of Stem Cell Underuse as Transplants Reach 1 Million Worldwide − Yesterday
• Cancer Screening Concerns − Yesterday
 
AIDS, HIV

Sub-Saharan Africans Rate Their Well-being And Health Care among the Lowest in the World


3 days ago − Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
• HIV Latency Is Not an Accident: It Is a Survival Tactic Employed by the Virus − Yesterday
• HIV Transmission at Each Step of the Care Continuum in the United States − 5 days ago
• Better Informed Women Less Likely to Want a Breast Mammogram - World First Lancet Study − 10 days ago
• Fast-replicating HIV Strains Drive Inflammation And Disease Progression − 10 days ago
• Hearing Experts Break Sound Barrier for Children Born Without Hearing Nerve − 14 days ago
• Key to Blocking Influenza Virus May Lie in a Cell's Own Machinery − 15 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction
The Numbers Are In: 1.8 Millions Australian Smokers Likely to Die from Their Habit

Yesterday − University of Melbourne
The research, published today in the international journal BMC Medicine, is an important reminder about the extreme hazards of smoking. "While Australia is a world leader in tobacco control, the battle to reduce the public health consequences of tobacco use is far from over," Laureate Professor Alan Lopez, Director, of the Global Burden of Disease Group, University of Melbourne said. …
• Sleeping over 8 Hours a Day Associated with Greater Risk of Stroke − 3 days ago
• Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation − 3 days ago
• Unusual Disease That Causes Acute Confusion May Be Underdiagnosed − 3 days ago
• International Classification of Functioning, Disability And Health Benefits Neurorehab Research And Patient Care − 3 days ago
• Taking NSAIDs with Anti-clotting Medications And Risk of Bleeding, CV Events − 4 days ago
• Women's Heart Disease Should Be a Research Priority − 4 days ago
 
Surgery

A Study Relates the Level of Pollutants Accumulated in the Body with Obesity Levels


Yesterday − University of Granada
• Research Suggests Anesthetics Could Have Long-term Impact on Children's Brains − 2 days ago
• Study Reveals Possible Biological Trigger for Canine Bone Cancer − 3 days ago
• Graphene Shows Potential as Novel Anti-cancer Therapeutic Strategy − 3 days ago
• Postoperative Mortality Rates Low among Patients with HIV Prescribed ART − 3 days ago
• Cherenkov Effect Improves Radiation Therapy for Patients with Cancer − 3 days ago
• One in 3 Women Could Potentially Be Spared Chronic Pain After Breast Cancer Surgery − 3 days ago
 
Infectious Disease
Global Health Experts Call into Question Sub-Saharan Cancer Data

Yesterday − Queen Mary, University of London
Global health experts believe the current data on cancer prevalence, incidence and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa - which determines how billions of pounds of international development money is spent - are weak and could mean vital funds are being deflected from other priorities. These include diarrhoeal and waterborne diseases, malnutrition, sanitation and the need to strengthen health systems. …
• HIV Controls Its Activity Independent of Host Cells − Yesterday
• Largest Study of Its Kind Documents Causes of Childhood Community-acquired Pneumonia − 3 days ago
• Malaria Plays Hide-and-seek with Immune System by Using Long Noncoding RNA to Switch Genes − 3 days ago
• Improving Inmate Health Can Lead to Better Community Health And Safety − 3 days ago
• Garlic Extract Could Help Cystic Fibrosis Patients Fight Infection − 4 days ago
 
Nutrition, Obesity

Breakfast Habits Affect Teens' Metabolic Responses to Protein-packed Morning Meals


3 days ago − University of Missouri-Columbia
• Team Approach Boosts Human And Environmental Wellbeing − 2 days ago
• Plant Chemicals May Prevent Liver Damage Caused by Fat Accumulated During Menopause − 3 days ago
• Do Genes Play a Role in Peanut Allergies? New Study Suggests Yes − 4 days ago
• Marine Oil Supplement Has Positive Effects on Post-exercise Muscle Damage − 4 days ago
• Diet High in Red Meat May Make Kidney Disease Worse − 5 days ago
 
Pharmaceutical

Discovery of the Genetic Fingerprint of Aggressive Colon Tumors


5 days ago − Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)
• Do Genes Play a Role in Peanut Allergies? New Study Suggests Yes − 4 days ago
• Marine Oil Supplement Has Positive Effects on Post-exercise Muscle Damage − 4 days ago
• Small Molecule Might Help Reduce Cancer in At-risk Population, Stanford Study Finds − 5 days ago
• Inherited Gene Variation Leaves Young Leukemia Patients at Risk for Peripheral Neuropathy − 4 days ago
• Disparities in Breast Cancer Care Linked to Net Worth − 5 days ago
 
Urology

Science: Chromosome 'Bumper Repair' Gene Predicts Cancer Patient Outcomes


10 days ago − University of Colorado Denver
• New Health Care Delivery Model for Prostate Cancer Care Results in Better Patient Outcomes − 4 days ago
• Androgen Receptor Abnormality May Not Be Associated − 4 days ago
• 1 Minute Test Predicts How Well a Patient May Recover After an Operation − 3 days ago
• Close Monitoring of Renal Tumors May Provide Alternative to Surgery − 1 months ago
• New Sequencing Technique Reveals Genetic Clues to Rare Breast Tumors − 1 months ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology
Proactive Labor Induction Can Improve Perinatal Outcomes, Suggests New Danish Study

9 days ago − Wiley
A proactive labour induction practice once women are full term can improve perinatal outcomes suggests a new Danish study, published today (18 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). …
• Risk of Unexpected Sarcoma Being Discovered After Hysterectomy Appears Fairly Low − 9 days ago
• Cerebral Palsy - It Can Be in Your Genes − 16 days ago
• New Screening Tool Could Speed Development of Ovarian Cancer Drugs − 18 days ago
• Exposure to Mercury, Seafood Associated with Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease − 18 days ago
• Women with a Pregnancy History of Spontaneous Preterm Delivery at Higher Risk of CVD − 18 days ago
 
Pathology
Cardiac And Respiratory Function Supported by Abdominal Muscles in Muscular Dystrophy

Yesterday − IOS Press
Amsterdam, NL, February, 26. 2015 - The muscular dystrophies are known to target various muscle groups differentially. In addition to making limb muscles weak, muscular dystrophy (MD) can also lead to decreased function of specific muscles involved in respiration causing breathing difficulties as well as leading to cardiac problems. …
• New Breast Cancer Test Links Immune 'Hotspots' to Better Survival − Yesterday
• Penn Vet Researchers Identify Effective Treatment for Niemann Pick Type C − 3 days ago
• Researchers Find Link Between Inflammation, Tissue Regeneration And Wound Repair Response − 3 days ago
• Mechanistic Insight into Immortal Cells Could Speed Clinical Use − 3 days ago
• Decline in Smoking Rates May Increase Lung Cancer Mortality − 4 days ago
 
Psychiatry
The Lancet: People with ADHD Are Twice as Likely to Die Prematurely, Often Due to Accidents

3 days ago − The Lancet
People with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)[1] have a lower life expectancy and are more than twice as likely to die prematurely as those without the disorder, according to new research published in The Lancet. Accidents are the most common cause of death in people with ADHD, and the relative risk of dying is much higher for women than men with ADHD and individuals diagnosed in adulthood. The study…
• Diabetes And Depression Predict Dementia Risk in People with Slowing Minds − 8 days ago
• Tau-associated MAPT Gene Increases Risk for Alzheimer's Disease − 10 days ago
• Pitt Expert Talks About Teenage Brain Development at AAAS Annual Meeting − 12 days ago
• Study Finds Short-term Psychological Therapy Reduces Suicide Attempts in At-risk Soldiers − 15 days ago
• Middle-aged Men at Highest Risk of Suicide After Breathing Poor Air − 15 days ago
 
Pediatrics

Support for Sleeping In? Half of Parents Favor Later School Start Times for Teens


12 days ago − University of Michigan Health System
• Teen Girls from Rural Areas More Likely to Have Undiagnosed Asthma, Be Depressed − 4 days ago
• Immunization Rates Improve with Centralized Reminder System − 5 days ago
• Study Tested Centralized System for Reminding Families About Immunizations − 5 days ago
• Tests Reveal Under-reported Exposure to Tobacco Smoke among Preemies with Lung Disease − 5 days ago
• In Rural India, Children Receive Wrong Treatments for Deadly Ailments − 11 days ago
 
Neurology
Levodopa-carbidopa Intestinal Gel May Prove More Effective for Long-term Treatment of PD

Yesterday − IOS Press
Amsterdam, NL, February 26, 2015 - Although levodopa remains the "gold standard" to effectively control motor deficits in the treatment of early stage Parkinson's disease (PD), it loses effectiveness as the disease progresses. After four to six years of treatment with oral medications for Parkinson's disease, about 40% of patients experience lack of muscle control (dyskinesias), end-of-dose wearing off, and fluctuations in "On/Off" states. By nine years of treatment,…
• Penn Vet Researchers Identify Effective Treatment for Niemann Pick Type C − 3 days ago
• Sleeping over 8 Hours a Day Associated with Greater Risk of Stroke − 3 days ago
• Unusual Disease That Causes Acute Confusion May Be Underdiagnosed − 3 days ago
• International Classification of Functioning, Disability And Health Benefits Neurorehab Research And Patient Care − 3 days ago
• Direct Brain Neurostimulation for Partial Onset Seizures Provides Long-term Benefit − 4 days ago
 
Cardiology

More Than 2 Hours of TV a Day Increases High Blood Pressure Risk in Children by 30 Percent


3 days ago − FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology
• Women Veterans Younger, More Depressed When Referred for Heart Test − Yesterday
• Intense Anger Associated with High Risk of Heart Attack − 4 days ago
• Working in an Interventional Laboratory May Lead to Health Problems − 5 days ago
• Most Clinical 'Calculators' Over-estimate Heart Attack Risk − 11 days ago
• Alirocumab Shows Promise as Treatment to Reduce LDL-cholesterol in Phase III Study − 11 days ago
 
Radiology

Tau-associated MAPT Gene Increases Risk for Alzheimer's Disease


10 days ago − University of California - San Diego
• Working in an Interventional Laboratory May Lead to Health Problems − 5 days ago
• Customized DNA Rings Aid Early Cancer Detection in Mice, Stanford Study Finds − 5 days ago
• Sunlight Continues to Damage Skin in the Dark − 9 days ago
• Ultrasound Lags Behind MRI for Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening − Yesterday
• Lung Screening Guidelines Improve on Study Findings − 18 days ago
 
Endocrinology
Million Man Study Examines Long-term Effects of Blocking Inflammation

3 days ago − University of Cambridge
Inflammation - the body's response to damaging stimuli - may have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to a study published today in the journal Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. …
• Study Finds Hormone Therapy in Transgender Adults Safe − 4 days ago
• Too Many Food Choices Exacerbate the Battle Against Obesity, Researchers Find − 4 days ago
• Vitamin D Deficiency Linked More Closely to Diabetes Than Obesity − 5 days ago
• Interventions Lower Diabetes Risk in Women Who Had Gestational Diabetes − 5 days ago
• Napping Reverses Health Effects of Poor Sleep − 17 days ago
 
Endocrinology
Parkinson's Disease Patients Have Reduced Visual Contrast Acuity

3 days ago − IOS Press
Amsterdam, NL, February 25, 2015 - Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have difficulties with visual acuity in low-contrast images. Because they may have normal high-contrast vision, this is often overlooked during routine eye exams. In the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, researchers report that PD patients had significantly worse vision for low-contrast images at close (40 cm) and far (2 m) distances. Even for high-contrast…
• Wisdom Teeth Stem Cells Can Transform into Cells That Could Treat Corneal Scarring − 5 days ago
• UW Ophthalmologists Help Demonstrate Effectiveness of Diabetic Macular Edema Treatments − 9 days ago
• Ranibizumab Reverses Vision Loss Caused by Diabetes − 9 days ago
• Joslin Researchers Find Drugs Are Effective for Diabetic Macular Edema in New Trial − 9 days ago
• 25% of Homeless People Surveyed in Toronto Report Vision Problems − 23 days ago
 
Dermatology
Marshaling the Body's Own Weapons Against Psoriasis

2 days ago − Technische Universitaet Muenchen
A three-character code brings relief to patients with psoriasis and sheds light on complex immunoregulation processes: IL-4, an abbreviation for the endogenous signaling molecule Interleukin 4. The substance's ability to inhibit inflammation is well known, but its mechanism of action was not fully understood. Scientists from the Technische Universität München (TUM) and the University of Tübingen have now shown in an animal model and in a study on patients…
• Sunlight Continues to Damage Skin in the Dark − 9 days ago
• Needle-free Vaccination: How Scientists Ask Skin Cells for Help − 9 days ago
• Licorice Extract Protects the Skin from UV-induced Stress − 9 days ago
• Unlikely That Topical Pimecrolimus Associated with Increased Risk of Cancer − 10 days ago
• Two Cell-signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma − 15 days ago
 
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