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Medicine & Health »RSS
New Findings Will Improve the Sex Lives of Women with Back Problems

8 hours ago − University of Waterloo
Newly published findings from the University of Waterloo are giving women with bad backs renewed hope for better sex lives. The findings—part of the first-ever study to document how the spine moves during sex—outline which sex positions are best for women suffering from different types of low-back pain. The new recommendations follow on the heels of comparable guidelines for men released last month. …
• Without Swift Influx of Substantial Aid, Ebola Epidemic in Africa Poised to Explode − 8 hours ago
• For Brain Hemorrhage, Risk of Death Is Lower at High-volume Hospitals − 8 hours ago
• Growing a Blood Vessel in a Week − 8 hours ago
• Endurance Athletes at Risk of Swimming-induced Pulmonary Edema − 8 hours ago
• Cat Dentals Fill You with Dread? − 8 hours ago
• Treating Ill Health Might Not Be Enough to Help Homeless People Get Off the Streets − 8 hours ago
• Volunteer Guidelines for Clinicians in the Ebola Epidemic − 8 hours ago
• Shutting Off Blood Supply to an Extremity to Protect the Heart − 8 hours ago
More »

Most Popular »
1
Cancer
10-23-14

Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors

2
Skin
10-23-14
Sunshine May Slow Weight Gain And Diabetes Onset, Study Suggests
Exposure to moderate amounts of sunshine may slow the development of obesity and diabetes, a study suggests. Scientists who looked at the effect of sunlight on mice say…
3
People
10-22-14
Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache?
MINNEAPOLIS – Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014, online issue of…
4
Obesity
10-23-14

UT Southwestern Scientists Discover New Clues to How Weight Loss Is Regulated

5
Women
10-08-14
Healthy Lifestyle May Cut Stroke Risk in Half for Women
MINNEAPOLIS – Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October…
6
Cancer
10-23-14

Cancer Exosome 'Micro Factories' Aid in Cancer Progression

7
Eye
10-23-14
Progression of Age-related Macular Degeneration in One Eye Then Fellow Eye
Having age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in one eye was associated with an increased incidence of AMD and accelerated progression of the debilitating disease in the other eye, writes author…
8
Histone
10-23-14

YEATS Protein Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer

9
Dietary
10-22-14
Cancer Patients Should Not Hesitate to Speak with Their Doctors About Dietary Supplements
Many cancer patients use dietary supplements such as vitamins, minerals and herbs or other botanicals but often don't tell their doctor. …
10
People
10-23-14

Study: Many in US Have Poor Nutrition, with the Disabled Doing Worst

11
Brain
10-23-14

New Window of Opportunity to Prevent Cardiovascular And Cerebrovascular Diseases

12
Brain
04-10-14
Yale Researchers Search for Earliest Roots of Psychiatric Disorders
Newborns whose mothers were exposed during pregnancy to any one of a variety of environmental stressors — such as trauma, illness, and alcohol or drug abuse — become susceptible…
13
Stroke
10-23-14
Costs to Treat Bleeding Strokes Increases 10 Years Later
Costs to treat strokes caused by bleeding in the brain may increase significantly 10 years later, according to a study in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. The…
14
Burden
10-23-14
62% of Colorectal Cancer Patients Report Financial Burden from Treatment, Study Finds
ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study from researchers…
More » 
Cancer, Oncology
Prognostic Factors Identified for Peripheral Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Lung

8 hours ago − International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
DENVER – A better survival outcome is associated with low blood levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, or absence of tumor invasion either into the space between the lungs and chest wall or into blood vessels of individuals with a peripheral squamous cell carcinoma, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). …
• Scientists Engineer Toxin-secreting Stem Cells to Treat Brain Tumors − 8 hours ago
• UT Southwestern Scientists Discover New Clues to How Weight Loss Is Regulated − Yesterday
• YEATS Protein Potential Therapeutic Target for Cancer − Yesterday
• Cancer Exosome 'Micro Factories' Aid in Cancer Progression − Yesterday
• Thyroid Cancer Genome Analysis Finds Markers of Aggressive Tumors − Yesterday
• Sunshine May Slow Weight Gain And Diabetes Onset, Study Suggests − Yesterday
 
AIDS, HIV

Study Models Ways to Cut Mexico's HIV Rates


9 days ago − Brown University
• New Class of Drugs Shows Promise in Treating Chronic Diarrhea − 4 days ago
• Rats of New York And the Diseases They Carry − 10 days ago
• One Gene Links Susceptibility to Rare Infections with Predisposition to Autoimmune Disease − 10 days ago
• Antiretroviral Therapy Benefits HIV-infected Stimulant Users, UCSF Study Shows − 14 days ago
• It's Time to Fight Sepsis Like We Fight Heart Attack, UM Researchers Say − 17 days ago
• Effective Treatments Available for HIV Patients Not Eligible for Efavirenz Regimens − 18 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction
For Brain Hemorrhage, Risk of Death Is Lower at High-volume Hospitals

8 hours ago − Wolters Kluwer Health
October 24, 2014 – For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. …
• Growing a Blood Vessel in a Week − 8 hours ago
• Endurance Athletes at Risk of Swimming-induced Pulmonary Edema − 8 hours ago
• Medical Costs for Stroke Survivors Stay High 10 Years On − 8 hours ago
• Costs to Treat Bleeding Strokes Increases 10 Years Later − Yesterday
• Wayne State Researcher Finds Key Signaling Pathway in Cause of Preeclampsia − Yesterday
• Clinical Trial Could Change Standard Treatment for Stroke − 2 days ago
 
Surgery

'Watch' Cites Concern About Flexible Reamer Breakage During Anatomic ACL Reconstruction


Yesterday − Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery
• Shutting Off Blood Supply to an Extremity to Protect the Heart − 8 hours ago
• Prognostic Factors Identified for Peripheral Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Lung − 8 hours ago
• Clues to Genetics of Congenital Heart Defects Emerge from Down Syndrome Study − 8 hours ago
• Dartmouth Study Measures Breast Cancer Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy − Yesterday
• 62% of Colorectal Cancer Patients Report Financial Burden from Treatment, Study Finds − Yesterday
• Cat Dentals Fill You with Dread? − 8 hours ago
 
Infectious Disease

Treating Ill Health Might Not Be Enough to Help Homeless People Get Off the Streets


8 hours ago − St. Michael's Hospital
• Without Swift Influx of Substantial Aid, Ebola Epidemic in Africa Poised to Explode − 8 hours ago
• Ebola Virus: Update on Research in France − 8 hours ago
• APIC Ebola Readiness Survey Findings − 8 hours ago
• 'Breath Test' Shows Promise for Diagnosing Fungal Pneumonia − Yesterday
• Expert Recommendations for Diagnosing Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome − 2 days ago
 
Nutrition, Obesity
Screening Questions Fail to Identify Teens at Risk for Hearing Loss

Yesterday − Penn State
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions. …
• Study: Many in US Have Poor Nutrition, with the Disabled Doing Worst − Yesterday
• Time for Change - Additional Daylight Saving Could Improve Public Health − Yesterday
• Study Shows How Troubled Marriage, Depression History Promote Obesity − 2 days ago
• Diet for Your DNA: Novel Nutrition Plan Sparks Debate Around Data Protection − 2 days ago
• Misreporting Diet Information Could Impact Nutrition Recommendations for Hispanics − 3 days ago
 
Pharmaceutical
New Compounds Reduce Debilitating Inflammation

8 hours ago − Case Western Reserve University
Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The compounds, dubbed OD36 and OD38, specifically appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2 (serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase 2). RIPK2 is an enzyme that activates high-energy molecules to prompt the immune system to respond with inflammation. The findings…
• Study Finds High Percentage of Recalled Dietary Supplements Still Have Banned Ingredients − 2 days ago
• Study Examines Differences Between Types of Physician Practice Ownership And Expenditures − 2 days ago
• Design of Micro And Nanoparticles to Improve Treatments for Alzheimer's And Parkinson's − 4 days ago
• Supercomputers Link Proteins to Drug Side Effects − 4 days ago
• I Have Anxiety, Why Is My Doctor Prescribing an Antipsychotic? − 4 days ago
 
Urology

Quality of Biopsy Directly Linked to Survival in Bladder Cancer Patients


2 days ago − University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
• How Closely Do Urologists Adhere to AUA Guidelines? − 9 days ago
• Potty Training Before Age 2 Linked to Increased Risk of Later Wetting Problems − 17 days ago
• USC Researchers Discover Dual Purpose of Cancer Drug in Regulating Expression of Genes − 29 days ago
• Professional Recommendations Against Routine Prostate Cancer Screening Have Little Effect − 1 months ago
• Nature: New Drug Blocks Gene Driving Cancer Growth − 1 months ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology

New Analysis Methodology May Revolutionize Breast Cancer Therapy


3 days ago − University of Vienna
• BJOG Releases MPT Special Supplement − 2 days ago
• Wayne State Researcher Finds Key Signaling Pathway in Cause of Preeclampsia − Yesterday
• New Test Can Help Doctors Choose Best Treatment for Ovarian Cancer − 8 days ago
• Study Identifies Risk Factors for Sexual Assault, Including Age And Alcohol Consumption − 9 days ago
• Scientists Identify Potential Cause for 40% of Pre-term Births − 10 days ago
 
Pathology

New Test Scans All Genes to ID Single Mutation Causing Rare Disorders


4 days ago − University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
• European Multicenter Harmonization Study Shows Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Immunohistochemistry Testing Comparable To, If Not Better Than, Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Testing − Yesterday
• Quality of Biopsy Directly Linked to Survival in Bladder Cancer Patients − 2 days ago
• Finally: A Missing Link Between Vitamin D And Prostate Cancer − 2 days ago
• Silencing the Speech Gene FOXP2 Causes Breast Cancer Cells to Metastasize − 2 days ago
• Antibiotics May Help Salmonella Spread in Infected Animals, Stanford Scientists Learn − 4 days ago
 
Psychiatry

New Window of Opportunity to Prevent Cardiovascular And Cerebrovascular Diseases


Yesterday − The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
• Treating Ill Health Might Not Be Enough to Help Homeless People Get Off the Streets − 8 hours ago
• Baby Cries Show Evidence of Cocaine Exposure During Pregnancy − 2 days ago
• Bipolar Disorder Discovery at the Nano Level − 2 days ago
• Study Shows How Troubled Marriage, Depression History Promote Obesity − 2 days ago
• UCSF Researchers Identify Key Factor in Transition from Moderate to Problem Drinking − 3 days ago
 
Pediatrics
Clues to Genetics of Congenital Heart Defects Emerge from Down Syndrome Study

8 hours ago − Emory Health Sciences
Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality in humans, involving a third copy of all or part of chromosome 21. In addition to intellectual disability, individuals with Down syndrome have a high risk of congenital heart defects. However, not all people with Down syndrome have them – about half have structurally normal hearts. …
• Screening Questions Fail to Identify Teens at Risk for Hearing Loss − Yesterday
• New Test Could Identify Infants with Rare Insulin Disease − Yesterday
• Baby Cries Show Evidence of Cocaine Exposure During Pregnancy − 2 days ago
• Indiana Project Screenings Show Need for More Mental Health Services in Youth Detention − 2 days ago
• New Treatment Resolves a Hazardous Airway Complication in Child with Heart Disease − 2 days ago
 
Neurology

New, Faster Therapeutic Hypothermia Techniques


Yesterday − Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
• New ALS Associated Gene Identified Using Innovative Strategy − 2 days ago
• Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache? − 2 days ago
• Clot Dissolver TPA's Tardy Twin Could Aid in Stroke Recovery − 2 days ago
• Smoking Interferes with Neurocognitive Recovery During Abstinence from Alcohol − 2 days ago
• UCSF Researchers Identify Key Factor in Transition from Moderate to Problem Drinking − 3 days ago
 
Cardiology

New Window of Opportunity to Prevent Cardiovascular And Cerebrovascular Diseases


Yesterday − The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
• Shutting Off Blood Supply to an Extremity to Protect the Heart − 8 hours ago
• One in 5 Physicians Unaware Their Patients Have Central Venous Catheters − 4 days ago
• Women More Likely to Develop Anxiety And Depression After Heart Attack − 4 days ago
• Vitamin D Deficiency Increases Poor Brain Function After Cardiac Arrest by Sevenfold − 4 days ago
• Heart Rate May Predict Survival And Brain Function in Comatose Cardiac Arrest Survivors − 4 days ago
 
Radiology

New Treatment Resolves a Hazardous Airway Complication in Child with Heart Disease


2 days ago − Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
• Smoking Interferes with Neurocognitive Recovery During Abstinence from Alcohol − 2 days ago
• Patients Who Have Left Breast Tumors Have Comparable OS to Those with Right Breast Tumors − 4 days ago
• Teenage Baseball Pitchers at Risk for Permanent Shoulder Injury − 10 days ago
• MRI Technique Detects Evidence of Cognitive Decline Before Symptoms Appear − 17 days ago
• NCI/FDA Lung Cancer Workshop Leads to the Innovatively Designed Clinical Trials − 29 days ago
 
Endocrinology

Lab-developed Intestinal Organoids Form Mature Human Tissue in Mice


4 days ago − Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
• Osteoporosis Screening Guidelines Miss Many Younger Post-menopausal Women − 2 days ago
• New Test Could Identify Infants with Rare Insulin Disease − Yesterday
• The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Gradual Weight Loss No Better Than Rapid Weight Loss for Long-term Weight Control − 8 days ago
• Cushing's Syndrome: LCSB Researchers Characterize a New Tumor Syndrome − 10 days ago
• Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals Alter Thyroid Hormone Activity During Pregnancy − 15 days ago
 
Endocrinology
Tear Duct Implant Effective at Reducing Pain And Inflammation in Cataract Surgery Patients

4 days ago − American Academy of Ophthalmology
CHICAGO – Oct. 19, 2014 – The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The device, known as a punctum plug, automatically delivers the correct…
• Smartphone Approach Examining Diabetic Eye Disease Offers Comparable Results to Traditional Method − 4 days ago
• Research Reveals Likelihood, Onset of MS Diagnosis among Patients with Inflammatory Eye Disease − 4 days ago
• iPhones for Eye Health: Capturing Ocular Images in Difficult-to-photograph Patients − 4 days ago
• iPads Detect Early Signs of Glaucoma in Nepal Eye Screening − 4 days ago
• Could Reading Glasses Soon Be a Thing of the Past? − 4 days ago
 
Dermatology

Unusual Skin Cancer Linked to Chronic Allergy from Metal Orthopedic Implant


15 days ago − Washington University School of Medicine
• Online Dermatologic Follow-up for Atopic Dermatitis Earns Equivalent Results − 2 days ago
• Ebola Highlights Disparity of Disease Burden in Developed Vs. Developing Countries − 8 days ago
• Penn Medicine Researchers Zero in on Psoriasis-hypertension Link − 9 days ago
• Uncontrolled Hypertension Highest among Patients with Moderate-to-severe Psoriasis − 9 days ago
• Sunshine May Slow Weight Gain And Diabetes Onset, Study Suggests − Yesterday
 
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