Japanese  
  Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Medicine & Health »RSS
Researchers Uncover the Secret Lymphatic Identity of the Schlemm's Canal

14 hours ago − Journal of Clinical Investigation
Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. A major risk factor for glaucoma is elevated eye pressure due to poor drainage of aqueous humor, the fluid that provides nutrients to the eye. A specialized structure, called Schlemm's canal funnels aqueous humor from the eye back into circulation. Schlemm's canal function is critical to prevent pressure build up in the eye. In this issue of the Journal…
• Study Shows Epigenetic Changes Can Drive Cancer − 14 hours ago
• Slow Walking Speed And Memory Complaints Can Predict Dementia − 14 hours ago
• New EMS System in Arizona Dramatically Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest − 14 hours ago
• Whitehead Institute Researchers Create 'Naïve' Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells − 20 hours ago
• Manipulating Key Protein in the Brain Holds Potential Against Obesity And Diabetes − 20 hours ago
• Scientists Test Nanoparticle 'Alarm Clock' to Awaken Immune Systems Put to Sleep by Cancer − 20 hours ago
• Anti-inflammatory Drug Can Prevent Neuron Loss in Parkinson's Model − 20 hours ago
• Clearing Cells to Prevent Cervical Cancer − 20 hours ago
More »

Most Popular »
Protein
03-31-14

New Gel to Promote Bone Growth on Implants Used in Surgical Procedures

Nps
07-23-14

New York Law Offers Nurses More Recognition, Responsibility

Eye
07-25-14
Researchers Uncover the Secret Lymphatic Identity of the Schlemm's Canal
Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. A major risk factor for glaucoma is elevated eye pressure due to poor drainage of aqueous humor, the fluid…
Cancer
07-25-14
Study Shows Epigenetic Changes Can Drive Cancer
Houston -- Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes – which don't change…
Human
07-25-14
Whitehead Institute Researchers Create 'Naïve' Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (July 24, 2014) – For years, researchers and patients have hoped that embryonic stem cells (ESCs)—capable of forming nearly any cell type in the body—could provide insight…
Diabetes
07-25-14
Manipulating Key Protein in the Brain Holds Potential Against Obesity And Diabetes
DALLAS -- A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, UT Southwestern Medical…
Obese
07-23-14
Obesity Linked to Low Endurance, Increased Fatigue in the Workplace
FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- U.S. workplaces may need to consider innovative methods to prevent fatigue from developing in employees who are obese. Based on results from a new study…
Hiv
07-24-14

TGen-led Study Seeks to Understand Why Some HIV-positive Men Are More Infectious

Cancer
07-25-14
Scientists Test Nanoparticle 'Alarm Clock' to Awaken Immune Systems Put to Sleep by Cancer
(Lebanon, NH, 7/25/14) — Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. Tumors…
Arrest
07-25-14
New EMS System in Arizona Dramatically Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest
WASHINGTON -- A new system that sent patients to designated cardiac receiving centers dramatically increased the survival rate of victims of sudden cardiac arrest in Arizona, according to a…
Weeks
07-25-14
Vanderbilt Study Examines Bacteria's Ability to Fight Obesity
A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of…
Thyroid
07-25-14
Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients
PITTSBURGH -- The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and…
Melatonin
07-25-14

Total Darkness at Night Is Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy - Tulane Study

Ameer
07-24-14
Antioxidant Biomaterial Promotes Healing
When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds. According to Northwestern University's Guillermo Ameer, most of…
More » 
Cancer, Oncology
Study Shows Epigenetic Changes Can Drive Cancer

14 hours ago − Baylor College of Medicine
Houston -- Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes – which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' – also play a role in cancer. In particular DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group (or molecule), is an epigenetic switch that can stably turn off genes, suggesting the potential…
• Scientists Test Nanoparticle 'Alarm Clock' to Awaken Immune Systems Put to Sleep by Cancer − 20 hours ago
• Clearing Cells to Prevent Cervical Cancer − 20 hours ago
• Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients − 22 hours ago
• Total Darkness at Night Is Key to Success of Breast Cancer Therapy - Tulane Study − 22 hours ago
• Is Europe Putting Cancer Research at Risk? − 22 hours ago
• Brain Tumor Causes And Risk Factors Elude Scientists − 22 hours ago
 
AIDS, HIV

Temple University Researchers Eliminate the HIV Virus from Cultured Human Cells for First Time


4 days ago − Temple University Health System
• Mechanism Found for Development of Protective HIV Antibodies − Yesterday
• HIV Clinic-based Audio Project Emphasizes the Power of Patient Voices − 2 days ago
• Anti-cancer Drug Kicks HIV Out of Hiding − 3 days ago
• Miriam Hospital Physician Advocates Awareness, Collaboration to Combat Peaking Hep C Virus − Yesterday
• Circumcision Does Not Promote Risky Behavior by African Men − 4 days ago
• Study Examines Incentives to Increase Medical Male Circumcision to Help Reduce Risk of HIV − 4 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction
Heart Attack Patients Could Be Treated More Quickly After Manchester Research

22 hours ago − University of Manchester
Heart attack patients could be treated more quickly after Manchester research Clinical judgement, combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood test on arrival, is effective in reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for chest pain, a new study shows. The findings of a research group in Manchester, published in the Emergency Medicine Journal, could potentially make a huge difference to a large number of patients. …
• Investigation Raises New Concerns over Top-selling Blood Thinning Drug − Yesterday
• Monitoring Pulse After Stroke May Prevent a Second Stroke − 2 days ago
• Gene Variant Identified as a Heart Disease Risk Factor for Women − 3 days ago
• Should Men at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Receive Earlier Cholesterol Treatment? − 3 days ago
• Temple Study Compares Deep Vein Thrombosis Therapies − 3 days ago
• Ginkgo Biloba Enhances Neurogenesis And Improves Recovery Following a Stroke in Mice − 3 days ago
 
Surgery
Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients

22 hours ago − University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
PITTSBURGH -- The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter. …
• Penn Study: Incisionless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Cuts Hospital Length of Stay − Yesterday
• Antioxidant Biomaterial Promotes Healing − Yesterday
• Seeing the Same GP at Every Visit Will Reduce Emergency Department Attendance − Yesterday
• Study Examines Postoperative Pneumonia Prevention Program in Surgical Ward − 2 days ago
• Enhanced Recovery Program Following Colorectal Surgery at Community Hospitals − 2 days ago
• Anti-pain Agent Shrinks Oral Cancers, Leaves Healthy Tissues Alone − 2 days ago
 
Infectious Disease

One Route to Malaria Drug Resistance Found


Yesterday − Washington University School of Medicine
• TGen-led Study Seeks to Understand Why Some HIV-positive Men Are More Infectious − Yesterday
• Less Than 1% of UK Public Research Funding Spent on Antibiotic Research in Past 5 Years − Yesterday
• Miriam Hospital Physician Advocates Awareness, Collaboration to Combat Peaking Hep C Virus − Yesterday
• Mechanism Found for Development of Protective HIV Antibodies − Yesterday
• Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure And Herpes Infection in Infants Examined − Yesterday
 
Nutrition, Obesity

Strategy Proposed for Preventing Diseases of Aging


2 days ago − Washington University School of Medicine
• Overweight And Obese Preschoolers Lose More Weight When Parent Is Also Treated − Yesterday
• Farmers Market Vouchers May Boost Produce Consumption in Low-income Families − Yesterday
• Female Triathletes at Risk for Pelvic Floor Disorders And Other Complications − Yesterday
• Study Shows Epigenetic Changes Can Drive Cancer − 14 hours ago
• Age of Puberty in Girls Influenced by Which Parent Their Genes Are Inherited From − 2 days ago
 
Pharmaceutical
Miriam Hospital Physician Advocates Awareness, Collaboration to Combat Peaking Hep C Virus

Yesterday − Lifespan
PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities. Barriers to eliminating HCV in the United States, Taylor says,…
• Gene Changes in Breast Cancer Cells Pinpointed with New Computational Method − Yesterday
• A World First: Researchers Identify a Treatment That Prevents Tumor Metastasis − Yesterday
• Hormones After Breast Cancer: Not Fuel for the Fire After All? − 2 days ago
• Researchers Unlock the Protein Puzzle − 2 days ago
• Are State Medicaid Policies Sentencing People with Mental Illnesses to Prison? − 3 days ago
 
Urology

Game Theory Model Reveals Vulnerable Moments for Cancer Cells' Energy Production


10 days ago − Johns Hopkins Medicine
• Study: Robot-assisted Surgery for Prostate Cancer Controls the Disease for 10 Years − 9 days ago
• Prostate Cancer in Young Men - More Frequent And More Aggressive? − 10 days ago
• Continuous Antibiotics Not Necessary for Many Children with Common Prenatal Abnormality − Yesterday
• Depressed Men with Prostate Cancer Are Diagnosed Later Stage, Get Less Effective Therapies − 15 days ago
• Nonsurgical Treatment for Enlarged Prostate on the Horizon − 1 months ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology
Incomplete HPV Vaccination May Offer Some Protection

Yesterday − Boston University Medical Center
(Boston)--Minority women who received the Human Papillomavirus Vaccination (HPV) even after becoming sexually active had lower rates of abnormal Pap test results than those who were never vaccinated. These findings appear in the journal Sexually Transmitted Diseases. …
• Controlling Childbirth Pain Tied to Lower Depression Risk − 2 days ago
• Letrozole May Help Women with PCOS Become Pregnant − 16 days ago
• Mode of Delivery Following a Perineal Tear And Recurrence Rate in Subsequent Pregnancies − 16 days ago
• UI Researchers Find Early Predictor for Preeclampsia − 17 days ago
• Sutures Or Staples? the Best Choice for Closing a C-section − 18 days ago
 
Pathology
Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients

22 hours ago − University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
PITTSBURGH -- The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter. …
• TGen-led Study Seeks to Understand Why Some HIV-positive Men Are More Infectious − Yesterday
• Teens Pay High Psychiatric Toll When Raised in Conditions of Political Conflict − Yesterday
• Study Examines Presence of Uterine Cancers at the Time of Hysterectomy Using Morcellation − 3 days ago
• NYU Langone Investigators to Present New Research at 2014 Alzheimer's Association International Conference − 8 days ago
• Splice-switching Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Is New Method for Editing Gene Transcript − 8 days ago
 
Psychiatry
Warning: Birthdays Can Be Bad for Your Health

Yesterday − Wiley
New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people. This study of drinking behaviour in Ontario, Canada is published online today in the scientific journal Addiction. …
• Controlling Childbirth Pain Tied to Lower Depression Risk − 2 days ago
• International Team Sheds New Light on Biology Underlying Schizophrenia − 3 days ago
• Mount Sinai Scientists And International Team Shed New Light on Schizophrenia − 3 days ago
• Low Strength Brain Stimulation May Be Effective for Depression − 3 days ago
• International Team Sheds New Light on Biology Underlying Schizophrenia − 3 days ago
 
Pediatrics

Overweight And Obese Preschoolers Lose More Weight When Parent Is Also Treated


Yesterday − University at Buffalo
• Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure And Herpes Infection in Infants Examined − Yesterday
• Study Shows Epigenetic Changes Can Drive Cancer − 14 hours ago
• One Route to Malaria Drug Resistance Found − Yesterday
• Stress Tied to Change in Children's Gene Expression Related to Emotion Regulation, Physical Health − Yesterday
• UI Study Finds Potential Genetic Link Between Epilepsy And Neurodegenerative Disorders − 3 days ago
 
Neurology

Slow Walking Speed And Memory Complaints Can Predict Dementia


14 hours ago − Albert Einstein College of Medicine
• Experiences at Every Stage of Life Contribute to Cognitive Abilities in Old Age − 22 hours ago
• Monitoring Pulse After Stroke May Prevent a Second Stroke − 2 days ago
• New Research Finds Pathogenic Connection Between Autoimmune Disorders And Cancer − 3 days ago
• Diagnostic Criteria for Christianson Syndrome − 4 days ago
• 'Support' Cells in Brain Play Important Role in Down Syndrome − 7 days ago
 
Cardiology

Should Men at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Receive Earlier Cholesterol Treatment?


3 days ago − Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
• Temple Study Compares Deep Vein Thrombosis Therapies − 3 days ago
• Heart Disease: First Canadian Survey Shows Women Unaware of Symptoms And Risk Factors − 4 days ago
• Niacin Too Dangerous for Routine Cholesterol Therapy − 9 days ago
• The 'Obesity Paradox': Cardiovascular Mortality Lowest among Overweight Patients − 9 days ago
• Cardiac Patients Underserved Globally Due to Lack of Rehab Programs: York University Researcher − 10 days ago
 
Radiology

MyChart Use Skyrocketing among Cancer Patients, UT Southwestern Study Finds


16 days ago − UT Southwestern Medical Center
• Forty-five% Rise in Diagnostic Imaging Tests by GPs - New Study − 3 days ago
• Researchers Assess Emergency Radiology Response After Boston Marathon Bombings − 11 days ago
• ACR Statement on Cancer Study Regarding Patient Anxiety from CT Lung Cancer Screening − 22 hours ago
• Noninvasive Advanced Image Analysis Could Lead to Better Patient Care − 23 days ago
• 3D Mammography Detects More Invasive Cancers And Reduces Call-back Rates − 1 months ago
 
Endocrinology

Hormones After Breast Cancer: Not Fuel for the Fire After All?


2 days ago − Parsemus Foundation
• Test Increases Odds of Correct Surgery for Thyroid Cancer Patients − 22 hours ago
• Vitamin D Deficiency Raises Risk of Schizophrenia Diagnosis − 3 days ago
• High-salt Diet Doubles Threat of Cardiovascular Disease in People with Diabetes − 3 days ago
• Stanford Researchers Invent Nanotech Microchip to Diagnose Type-1 Diabetes − 12 days ago
• Scientists Discover Clues Why Weight-loss Surgery Cures Diabetes − 15 days ago
 
Endocrinology

Patient-specific Stem Cells And Personalized Gene Therapy


15 days ago − Columbia University Medical Center
• Nearsightedness Increases with Level of Education And Longer Schooling − 4 days ago
• Age-related Macular Degeneration Occurs Much Earlier Than Previously Assumed − 4 days ago
• Acute Glaucoma Discovered to Be an Inflammatory Disease − 11 days ago
• MUHC Researcher Unveils Novel Treatment for a Form of Childhood Blindness − 12 days ago
• Iodine May Alleviate Swelling in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients' Retinas − 4 days ago
 
Dermatology

Study of Dermatology on YouTube Shows New Ways Science Reaches Public


16 days ago − University of Colorado Denver
• New Diagnostic Test to Distinguish Psoriasis from Eczema − 15 days ago
• New Medication Shows Promise in Treating Common Skin Disease − 16 days ago
• Research Led by Temple's Chair of Dermatology: Pain And Itch May Be Signs of Skin Cancer − 2 days ago
• Collisions with Robots - Without Risk of Injury − 17 days ago
• Hypertension, Antihypertension Medication, Risk of Psoriasis − 23 days ago
 
ScienceNewsline  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile  |  Japanese Edition
The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program. All contents are copyright of their owners except U.S. Government works. U.S. Government works are assumed to be in the public domain unless otherwise noted. Everything else copyright ScienceNewsline.