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Medicine & Health »RSS
Yale Study Identifies Possible Bacterial Drivers of IBD

10 hours ago − Yale University
Yale University researchers have identified a handful of bacterial culprits that may drive inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, using patients' own intestinal immune responses as a guide. The findings are published Aug. 28 in the journal Cell. …
• Deadly Remedy: Warning Issued About Chinese Herbal Medicine − 10 hours ago
• Second-hand E-cig Smoke Compared to Regular Cigarette Smoke − 10 hours ago
• Penn-NIH Team Discover New Type of Cell Movement − 10 hours ago
• Are Cigarette Substitutes a Safe Alternative? It Depends on User Habits − 10 hours ago
• Complications of Tube Insertion in Ears Not Worse for Kids with Cleft Lip/Palate − 10 hours ago
• A VA Exit Strategy − 10 hours ago
• After Great Recession, Americans Are Unhappy, Worried, Pessimistic, Rutgers Study Finds − 10 hours ago
• Bradley Hospital Collaborative Study Identifies Genetic Change in Autism-related Gene − 10 hours ago
More »

Most Popular »
1
Support
08-28-14

Breastfeeding Study Shows Need for Effective Peer Counseling Programs

2
Thc
08-27-14
Marijuana Compound May Offer Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease
Tampa, FL (Aug. 26, 2014) -- Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a…
3
Dux4
08-28-14
UMN Researchers Find Animal Model for Understudied Type of Muscular Dystrophy
MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (August 28, 2014) – Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed an animal research model for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) to be used for muscle regeneration…
4
Low
08-27-14
Gang Life Brings Deep Health Risks for Girls
Being involved in a gang poses considerable health-related risks for adolescent African American girls, including more casual sex partners and substance abuse combined with less testing for HIV and…
5
Hot
08-27-14

The High Cost of Hot Flashes: Millions in Lost Wages Preventable

6
Dcpc
08-28-14
The Lancet Journals: Three-quarters of Depressed Cancer Patients Do Not Receive Treatment for Depression but a New Approach Could Transform Their Care
Three papers published in The Lancet Psychiatry, The Lancet, and The Lancet Oncology reveal that around three-quarters of cancer patients who have major depression are not currently receiving treatment…
7
Ebola
08-28-14
The Lancet: Respiratory Infection Controls Being Used for Ebola Patients Are Unnecessary And May Contribute to Public Panic
Respiratory infection control measures – which have been adopted by most health agencies to deal with the Ebola epidemic in west Africa – are unnecessary, and may heighten panic…
8
Lipids
08-27-14

Protein in 'Good Cholesterol' May Be a Key to Treating Pulmonary Hypertension

9
Adults
08-27-14
Lifetime of Fitness: A Fountain of Youth for Bone And Joint Health?
ROSEMONT, Ill.—Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior…
10
Pig
08-27-14

Piglet Weaning Age No Bar to Litter Frequency

11
Test
08-27-14

New Smartphone App Can Detect Newborn Jaundice in Minutes

12
Ibd
08-28-14

Yale Study Identifies Possible Bacterial Drivers of IBD

13
Women
08-28-14
Sensory-tested Drug-delivery Vehicle Could Limit Spread of HIV, AIDS
A unique method for delivering compounds that could positively impact the global battle against HIV and AIDS may be possible, thanks to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural…
14
Hip
08-26-14
Surgery to Repair a Hip Fracture Reduces Lifetime Health Care Costs by More Than $65,000 Per Patient
ROSEMONT, Ill.—Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy, and result in…
More » 
Cancer, Oncology

Penn-NIH Team Discover New Type of Cell Movement


10 hours ago − University of Pennsylvania
• Second-hand E-cig Smoke Compared to Regular Cigarette Smoke − 10 hours ago
• Breastfeeding Study Shows Need for Effective Peer Counseling Programs − 14 hours ago
• Circulating Tumor Cell Clusters More Likely to Cause Metastasis Than Single Cells − 14 hours ago
• New Tool Aids Stem Cell Engineering for Medical Research − 14 hours ago
• Research Shows How Premalignant Cells Can Sense Oncogenesis And Halt Growth − 14 hours ago
• UTHealth Researchers Find Up to 3,000 Times the Bacterial Growth on Hollow-head Toothbrushes − 16 hours ago
 
AIDS, HIV

CF Mucus Defect Present at Birth


14 days ago − University of Iowa Health Care
• New Tool Aids Stem Cell Engineering for Medical Research − 14 hours ago
• MU Researchers Discover Protein's Ability to Inhibit HIV Release − 3 days ago
• Lower Opioid Overdose Death Rates Associated with State Medical Marijuana Laws − 3 days ago
• New Biomarker Highly Promising for Predicting Breast Cancer Outcomes − 3 days ago
• Women's Health And Fifty Shades: Increased Risks for Young Adult Readers? − 7 days ago
• Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice, Stanford Scientists Find − 10 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction

A Prescription for Better Stroke Care


Yesterday − St. Michael's Hospital
• Aspirin Cuts Risk of Clots, DVT by a Third - New Study − 3 days ago
• Increased Risk of Stroke in People with Cognitive Impairment − 3 days ago
• A Novel Pathway for Prevention of Heart Attack And Stroke − 7 days ago
• TeleStroke Units Improve Stroke Care in Underserved Areas − 7 days ago
• Monthly Transfusions Reduce Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia − 8 days ago
• Regular Blood Transfusions Can Reduce Repeat Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Disease − 8 days ago
 
Surgery

From Nose to Knee: Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints


16 hours ago − University of Basel
• Females Ignored in Basic Medical Research − 16 hours ago
• The High Cost of Hot Flashes: Millions in Lost Wages Preventable − Yesterday
• Bundled Approach to Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Colorectal Surgery − Yesterday
• Men Who Are Uneducated About Their Prostate Cancer Have Difficulty Making Good Treatment Choices − Yesterday
• New Technology May Identify Tiny Strains in Body Tissues Before Injuries Occur − Yesterday
• Brain Benefits from Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery − 2 days ago
 
Infectious Disease

DeVincenzo Study Breakthrough in RSV Research


10 hours ago − Le Bonheur Children's Hospital
• Penn-NIH Team Discover New Type of Cell Movement − 10 hours ago
• The Lancet: Respiratory Infection Controls Being Used for Ebola Patients Are Unnecessary And May Contribute to Public Panic − 14 hours ago
• New Analysis of Old HIV Vaccines Finds Potentially Protective Immune Response − 14 hours ago
• Malaria Symptoms Fade on Repeat Infections Due to Loss of Immune Cells, UCSF-led Team Says − Yesterday
• Alcoholics Have an Abnormal CD8 T Cell Response to the Influenza Virus − 2 days ago
 
Nutrition, Obesity

Breastfeeding Study Shows Need for Effective Peer Counseling Programs


14 hours ago − University of Georgia
• Healthy Moms Program Helps Women Who Are Obese Limit Weight Gain During Pregnancy − 14 hours ago
• Lifetime of Fitness: A Fountain of Youth for Bone And Joint Health? − Yesterday
• Fighting Prostate Cancer with a Tomato-rich Diet − Yesterday
• Taking Aim at Added Sugars to Improve Americans' Health − Yesterday
• Social Inequalities in Salt Consumption Remain − Yesterday
 
Pharmaceutical
Queen's Scientists in Hospital Superbugs Breakthrough

9 days ago − Queen's University Belfast
Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs. The team from the School of Pharmacy at Queen's have developed the first innovative antibacterial gel that acts to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E. coli using natural proteins. …
• Digoxin Tied to Increased Risk of Death in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation − 17 days ago
• 'Worm Pill' Could Ease Autoimmune Disease Symptoms − 17 days ago
• Water-polluting Anxiety Drug Reduces Fish Mortality − 20 days ago
• Acute Psychological Stress Promotes Skin Healing in Mice − 21 days ago
• Curing Arthritis in Mice − 22 days ago
 
Urology
Men Who Are Uneducated About Their Prostate Cancer Have Difficulty Making Good Treatment Choices

Yesterday − University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
They say knowledge is power, and a new UCLA study has shown this is definitely the case when it comes to men making the best decisions about how to treat their prostate cancer. UCLA researchers found that men who aren't well educated about their disease have a much more difficult time making treatment decisions, called decisional conflict, a challenge that could negatively impact the quality of their care…
• Researchers Identify Potential Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Young Girls − 7 days ago
• Severe Infections with Hospitalization After Prostate Biopsy Rising in Sweden − 8 days ago
• Study Finds Increased Rates of Preventable Deaths in the US Following Common Urologic Procedures − 9 days ago
• Deaths Rise with Shift from In-hospital to Outpatient Procedures for Urology Surgeries − 9 days ago
• Less Radical Procedures Offer Similar Cancer Control for Kidney Cancer Patients − 16 days ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology

Scaling Up Health Innovation: Fertility Awareness-based Family Planning Goes National


9 days ago − Georgetown University Medical Center
• Women Will Benefit from the Affordable Care Act's Contraceptive Coverage − 9 days ago
• Is China's 50% Cesarean Section Delivery Rate Too High? − 8 days ago
• Provider And Parental Assumptions on Teen Sex Yield 'Missed Opportunities' for HPV Vaccine − 10 days ago
• Breech Babies Have Higher Risk of Death from Vaginal Delivery Compared to C-section − 17 days ago
• New Culprit Identified in Metabolic Syndrome − 20 days ago
 
Pathology

rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His Attenuates Oxidative Stress Induced Injury of PC12 Cells


8 days ago − Neural Regeneration Research
• Attacking a Rare Disease at Its Source with Gene Therapy − 2 days ago
• Alcoholics Have an Abnormal CD8 T Cell Response to the Influenza Virus − 2 days ago
• Genetics And Lifestyle Have a Strong Impact on Biomarkers for Inflammation And Cancer − 6 days ago
• Treatment for Overactive Bladder And Irritable Bowel Syndrome Advanced Through Pioneering Research − 7 days ago
• Sequence of Rare Kidney Cancer Reveals Unique Alterations Involving Telomerase − 7 days ago
 
Psychiatry

The High Cost of Hot Flashes: Millions in Lost Wages Preventable


Yesterday − Yale University
• The Lancet Journals: Three-quarters of Depressed Cancer Patients Do Not Receive Treatment for Depression but a New Approach Could Transform Their Care − 18 hours ago
• Bradley Hospital Collaborative Study Identifies Genetic Change in Autism-related Gene − 10 hours ago
• Scripps Research Institute Scientists Link Alcohol-dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter − Yesterday
• Xenon Exposure Shown to Erase Traumatic Memories − Yesterday
• Fear, Safety And the Role of Sleep in Human PTSD − Yesterday
 
Pediatrics
New Analysis of Old HIV Vaccines Finds Potentially Protective Immune Response

14 hours ago − Duke University Medical Center
DURHAM, N.C. – Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s. …
• New Smartphone App Can Detect Newborn Jaundice in Minutes − Yesterday
• Malaria Symptoms Fade on Repeat Infections Due to Loss of Immune Cells, UCSF-led Team Says − Yesterday
• Collaborative Care Improves Depression in Teens − 2 days ago
• New Estrogen-based Compound Suppresses Binge-like Eating Behavior in Female Mice − 2 days ago
• Weekend Hospitalization Linked to Longer Stay for Pediatric Leukemia Patients − 3 days ago
 
Neurology

Biologists Reprogram Skin Cells to Mimic Rare Disease


7 days ago − Johns Hopkins Medicine
• Surgical Complications of DBS No Higher Risk for Older Parkinson's Patients − 3 days ago
• Sleep Drunkenness Disorder May Affect 1 in 7 − 3 days ago
• A Novel Pathway for Prevention of Heart Attack And Stroke − 7 days ago
• Researchers Investigating New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis − Yesterday
• Children with Autism Have Extra Synapses in Brain − 7 days ago
 
Cardiology

Clinical Practice Guidelines: Trying to Get Them Right the First Time


9 days ago − University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
• New Statin Guidelines an Improvement, Yale Study Shows − 2 days ago
• UH Case Medical Center's Dr. Parikh Authors SCAI Paper on Renal Artery Stenosis Treatment − 6 days ago
• Rates of Heart Disease And Stroke Continue to Decline in Europe − 8 days ago
• New Study First to Examine Quality of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in Canada − 9 days ago
• Everest Expedition Provides First Evidence of Effects of Altitude on Blood Pressure − Yesterday
 
Radiology

Wii Balance Board Induces Changes in the Brains of MS Patients


2 days ago − Radiological Society of North America
• New Statin Guidelines an Improvement, Yale Study Shows − 2 days ago
• New Non-invasive Technique Controls Size of Molecules Penetrating the Blood-brain Barrier − 14 days ago
• Mammography Benefits Women over 75 − 23 days ago
• ACR Statement on Cancer Study Regarding Patient Anxiety from CT Lung Cancer Screening − 1 months ago
• Forty-five% Rise in Diagnostic Imaging Tests by GPs - New Study − 1 months ago
 
Endocrinology
Brain Benefits from Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery

2 days ago − The Endocrine Society
Washington, DC—Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Obesity can tax the brain as well as other organs. Obese individuals face a 35 percent higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease compared to normal weight people. …
• Exposure to Toxins Makes Great Granddaughters More Susceptible to Stress − 3 days ago
• Vitamin D Deficiency May Reduce Pregnancy Rate in Women Undergoing IVF − 14 days ago
• Reduced Testosterone Tied to Endocrine-disrupting Chemical Exposure − 14 days ago
• Mayo Clinic Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline − 14 days ago
• The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: 2 Out of Every 5 Americans Expected to Develop Type 2 Diabetes During Their Lifetime − 15 days ago
 
Endocrinology

USC Eye Institute Study Finds African-Americans at Higher Risk for Diabetic Vision Loss


8 days ago − University of Southern California - Health Sciences
• New DNA Test for Diagnosing Diseases Linked to Childhood Blindness − 7 days ago
• Researchers Pinpoint Most Common Causes of Dangerous Eye Infection Post Surgery And Trauma − 8 days ago
• USC Eye Institute Study Shows Native American Ancestry a Risk Factor for Eye Disease − 7 days ago
• UK Dyslexia Charities Should Give Balanced View on Expensive Lenses to Improve Reading − 8 days ago
• Proteins Critical to Wound Healing Identified − 10 days ago
 
Dermatology

FDA-approved Drug Restores Hair in Patients with Alopecia Areata


10 days ago − Columbia University Medical Center
• Patient, Tumor Characteristics for High-mitotic Rate Melanoma − 8 days ago
• Study Identifies Protein That Helps Prevent Active Tuberculosis in Infected Patients − 8 days ago
• Photodynamic Therapy Vs. Cryotherapy for Actinic Keratoses − Yesterday
• Acute Psychological Stress Promotes Skin Healing in Mice − 21 days ago
• Research Led by Temple's Chair of Dermatology: Pain And Itch May Be Signs of Skin Cancer − 1 months ago
 
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