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Medicine & Health »RSS
Faster, Cheaper Tests for Sickle Cell

7 hours ago − Harvard University
Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease. Thousands of children born in the developing world, however, aren't so lucky, meaning many suffer and die from the disease each year. A.J. Kumar hopes to put a halt to at least some of those deaths. …
• Quality of US Diet Improves, Gap Widens for Quality Between Rich And Poor − 7 hours ago
• Research Letter: Viewers Ate More While Watching Hollywood Action Flick on TV − 7 hours ago
• Quality of US Diet Shows Modest Improvement, but Overall Remains Poor − 7 hours ago
• Low-carb Vs. Low-fat Diets − 7 hours ago
• Location of Body Fat Can Increase Hypertension Risk − 7 hours ago
• Training Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods − 15 hours ago
• A Nucleotide Change Could Initiate Fragile X Syndrome − 15 hours ago
• Scientists Call for Investigation of Mysterious Cloud-like Collections in Cells − 15 hours ago
More »

Most Popular »
1
Cvd
09-01-14

Fruit Consumption Cuts CVD Risk by Up to 40 Percent

2
Food
09-01-14
Training Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods
BOSTON (September 1, 2014, 10:20 AM EDT) — It may be possible to train the brain to prefer healthy low-calorie foods over unhealthy higher-calorie foods, according to new research…
3
Hdl
09-01-14

Sugar Substance 'Kills' Good HDL Cholesterol, New Research Finds

4
Fragile
09-01-14

A Nucleotide Change Could Initiate Fragile X Syndrome

5
Risk
09-01-14

Permanent AF Doubles Risk of Stroke Compared to Paroxysmal AF

6
Support
08-28-14

Breastfeeding Study Shows Need for Effective Peer Counseling Programs

7
Sound
09-01-14
Research Letter: Viewers Ate More While Watching Hollywood Action Flick on TV
Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood…
8
Proteins
09-01-14
Scientists Call for Investigation of Mysterious Cloud-like Collections in Cells
WASHINGTON — About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what…
9
Points
09-01-14
Quality of US Diet Improves, Gap Widens for Quality Between Rich And Poor
The quality of the U.S. diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but…
10
Health
09-01-14
Doctor Revalidation Needs to Address 7 Key Issues for Success, Claims Report
New research launched today, 1st September 2014, has concluded that there are seven key issues that need to be addressed to ensure the future success of doctor revalidation, the…
11
Test
09-01-14

Faster, Cheaper Tests for Sickle Cell

12
Url
09-01-14
Low-carb Vs. Low-fat Diets
1. Low-carb trumps low-fat for weight loss and cardiovascular risk Free Summary for Patients http://www.annals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.7326/P14-9029
13
Fat
09-01-14
Location of Body Fat Can Increase Hypertension Risk
WASHINGTON (Sept. 1, 2014) — People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but…
14
Risk
09-01-14
Resistant Hypertension Increases Stroke Risk by 35% in Women And 20% in Elderly Taiwanese
Barcelona, Spain – Sunday 31 August 2014: Resistant hypertension increases the risk of stroke by 35% in women and 20% in elderly Taiwanese patients, according to research presented at…
More » 
Cancer, Oncology

'K-to-M' Histone Mutations: How Repressing the Repressors May Drive Tissue-specific Cancers


3 days ago − Stowers Institute for Medical Research
• Location of Body Fat Can Increase Hypertension Risk − 7 hours ago
• Scientists Call for Investigation of Mysterious Cloud-like Collections in Cells − 15 hours ago
• Invisible Blood in Urine May Indicate Bladder Cancer − 15 hours ago
• First Recommendations on All New Oral Anticoagulants in Pulmonary Embolism Published − 15 hours ago
• Preventing Cancer from Forming 'Tentacles' Stops Dangerous Spread − 3 days ago
• Assortativity Signatures of Transcription Factor Networks Contribute to Robustness − 3 days ago
 
AIDS, HIV

Women's Health And Fifty Shades: Increased Risks for Young Adult Readers?


11 days ago − Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News
• Sensory-tested Drug-delivery Vehicle Could Limit Spread of HIV, AIDS − 4 days ago
• New Tool Aids Stem Cell Engineering for Medical Research − 4 days ago
• MU Researchers Discover Protein's Ability to Inhibit HIV Release − 7 days ago
• Lower Opioid Overdose Death Rates Associated with State Medical Marijuana Laws − 7 days ago
• New Biomarker Highly Promising for Predicting Breast Cancer Outcomes − 7 days ago
• Mobile App on Emergency Cardiac Care Aids Best Decisions in Seconds − 3 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction

Fruit Consumption Cuts CVD Risk by Up to 40 Percent


15 hours ago − European Society of Cardiology
• Permanent AF Doubles Risk of Stroke Compared to Paroxysmal AF − 15 hours ago
• Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk of Subsequent Event − 15 hours ago
• Resistant Hypertension Increases Stroke Risk by 35% in Women And 20% in Elderly Taiwanese − 15 hours ago
• Renal Denervation Reduces Recurrent AF After Ablation − 15 hours ago
• First Comprehensive ESC Guidelines on Aortic Diseases Published − 15 hours ago
• Antihypertensive Therapy Reduces CV Events, Strokes And Mortality in Older Adults − 15 hours ago
 
Surgery

From Nose to Knee: Engineered Cartilage Regenerates Joints


4 days ago − University of Basel
• Medication Shows Mixed Results in Reducing Complications from Cardiac Surgery − 15 hours ago
• Sudden Death Predictor Identifies ICD Candidates in New ESC Guidelines − 15 hours ago
• Retrievable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Effective And Safe in Real World Setting − 15 hours ago
• First Comprehensive ESC Guidelines on Aortic Diseases Published − 15 hours ago
• ESC/EACTS Revascularization Guidelines Stress Benefit of Revascularization in Stable CAD − 15 hours ago
• Antidepressants Show Potential for Postoperative Pain − 3 days ago
 
Infectious Disease

Scientists Develop 'Electronic Nose' for Rapid Detection of C. Diff Infection


15 hours ago − University of Leicester
• New Tuberculosis Blood Test in Children Is Reliable And Highly Specific − 15 hours ago
• Mice Study Shows Efficacy of New Gene Therapy Approach for Toxin Exposures − 3 days ago
• MERS: Low Transmissibility, Dangerous Illness − 3 days ago
• The Lancet: China-themed Issue − 3 days ago
• Penn-NIH Team Discover New Type of Cell Movement − 4 days ago
 
Nutrition, Obesity
Quality of US Diet Improves, Gap Widens for Quality Between Rich And Poor

7 hours ago − The JAMA Network Journals
The quality of the U.S. diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor. …
• Quality of US Diet Shows Modest Improvement, but Overall Remains Poor − 7 hours ago
• Low-carb Vs. Low-fat Diets − 7 hours ago
• Training Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods − 15 hours ago
• Sugar Substance 'Kills' Good HDL Cholesterol, New Research Finds − 15 hours ago
• Breastfeeding Study Shows Need for Effective Peer Counseling Programs − 4 days ago
 
Pharmaceutical
Queen's Scientists in Hospital Superbugs Breakthrough

13 days ago − Queen's University Belfast
Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs. The team from the School of Pharmacy at Queen's have developed the first innovative antibacterial gel that acts to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E. coli using natural proteins. …
• Digoxin Tied to Increased Risk of Death in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation − 21 days ago
• 'Worm Pill' Could Ease Autoimmune Disease Symptoms − 21 days ago
• Water-polluting Anxiety Drug Reduces Fish Mortality − 24 days ago
• Acute Psychological Stress Promotes Skin Healing in Mice − 25 days ago
• Curing Arthritis in Mice − 26 days ago
 
Urology
Men Who Are Uneducated About Their Prostate Cancer Have Difficulty Making Good Treatment Choices

5 days ago − University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences
They say knowledge is power, and a new UCLA study has shown this is definitely the case when it comes to men making the best decisions about how to treat their prostate cancer. UCLA researchers found that men who aren't well educated about their disease have a much more difficult time making treatment decisions, called decisional conflict, a challenge that could negatively impact the quality of their care…
• Researchers Identify Potential Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Young Girls − 11 days ago
• Severe Infections with Hospitalization After Prostate Biopsy Rising in Sweden − 12 days ago
• Study Finds Increased Rates of Preventable Deaths in the US Following Common Urologic Procedures − 13 days ago
• Deaths Rise with Shift from In-hospital to Outpatient Procedures for Urology Surgeries − 13 days ago
• Less Radical Procedures Offer Similar Cancer Control for Kidney Cancer Patients − 20 days ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology

Scaling Up Health Innovation: Fertility Awareness-based Family Planning Goes National


13 days ago − Georgetown University Medical Center
• Women Will Benefit from the Affordable Care Act's Contraceptive Coverage − 13 days ago
• Is China's 50% Cesarean Section Delivery Rate Too High? − 12 days ago
• Provider And Parental Assumptions on Teen Sex Yield 'Missed Opportunities' for HPV Vaccine − 14 days ago
• Breech Babies Have Higher Risk of Death from Vaginal Delivery Compared to C-section − 21 days ago
• New Culprit Identified in Metabolic Syndrome − 24 days ago
 
Pathology

rAAV/ABAD-DP-6His Attenuates Oxidative Stress Induced Injury of PC12 Cells


12 days ago − Neural Regeneration Research
• Attacking a Rare Disease at Its Source with Gene Therapy − 6 days ago
• Alcoholics Have an Abnormal CD8 T Cell Response to the Influenza Virus − 6 days ago
• Genetics And Lifestyle Have a Strong Impact on Biomarkers for Inflammation And Cancer − 10 days ago
• Treatment for Overactive Bladder And Irritable Bowel Syndrome Advanced Through Pioneering Research − 11 days ago
• Sequence of Rare Kidney Cancer Reveals Unique Alterations Involving Telomerase − 11 days ago
 
Psychiatry

The High Cost of Hot Flashes: Millions in Lost Wages Preventable


5 days ago − Yale University
• Bradley Hospital Collaborative Study Identifies Genetic Change in Autism-related Gene − 4 days ago
• The Lancet Journals: Three-quarters of Depressed Cancer Patients Do Not Receive Treatment for Depression but a New Approach Could Transform Their Care − 4 days ago
• Training Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Foods − 15 hours ago
• Scripps Research Institute Scientists Link Alcohol-dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter − 5 days ago
• Xenon Exposure Shown to Erase Traumatic Memories − 5 days ago
 
Pediatrics
Scientists Call for Investigation of Mysterious Cloud-like Collections in Cells

15 hours ago − Georgetown University Medical Center
WASHINGTON — About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do — even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the life of a cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment. …
• New Analysis of Old HIV Vaccines Finds Potentially Protective Immune Response − 4 days ago
• New Smartphone App Can Detect Newborn Jaundice in Minutes − 5 days ago
• Malaria Symptoms Fade on Repeat Infections Due to Loss of Immune Cells, UCSF-led Team Says − 5 days ago
• Collaborative Care Improves Depression in Teens − 6 days ago
• New Estrogen-based Compound Suppresses Binge-like Eating Behavior in Female Mice − 6 days ago
 
Neurology

Biologists Reprogram Skin Cells to Mimic Rare Disease


11 days ago − Johns Hopkins Medicine
• Surgical Complications of DBS No Higher Risk for Older Parkinson's Patients − 7 days ago
• Sleep Drunkenness Disorder May Affect 1 in 7 − 7 days ago
• A Novel Pathway for Prevention of Heart Attack And Stroke − 11 days ago
• Researchers Investigating New Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis − 5 days ago
• Children with Autism Have Extra Synapses in Brain − 11 days ago
 
Cardiology

Permanent AF Doubles Risk of Stroke Compared to Paroxysmal AF


15 hours ago − European Society of Cardiology
• Location of Body Fat Can Increase Hypertension Risk − 7 hours ago
• Fruit Consumption Cuts CVD Risk by Up to 40 Percent − 15 hours ago
• Medication Shows Mixed Results in Reducing Complications from Cardiac Surgery − 15 hours ago
• Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk of Subsequent Event − 15 hours ago
• Wine Only Protects Against CVD in People Who Exercise − 15 hours ago
 
Radiology
New Statin Guidelines an Improvement, Yale Study Shows

6 days ago − Yale University
New Haven, Conn. – New national guidelines can improve the way statin drugs are prescribed to patients at risk for cardiovascular disease, a Yale University study has found. The research, published Aug. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, also showed the new guidelines produce only a modest increase in the number of patients being given the drugs. …
• Wii Balance Board Induces Changes in the Brains of MS Patients − 6 days ago
• New Non-invasive Technique Controls Size of Molecules Penetrating the Blood-brain Barrier − 18 days ago
• Mammography Benefits Women over 75 − 27 days ago
• ACR Statement on Cancer Study Regarding Patient Anxiety from CT Lung Cancer Screening − 1 months ago
• Forty-five% Rise in Diagnostic Imaging Tests by GPs - New Study − 1 months ago
 
Endocrinology
Brain Benefits from Weight Loss Following Bariatric Surgery

6 days ago − The Endocrine Society
Washington, DC—Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Obesity can tax the brain as well as other organs. Obese individuals face a 35 percent higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease compared to normal weight people. …
• Exposure to Toxins Makes Great Granddaughters More Susceptible to Stress − 7 days ago
• Vitamin D Deficiency May Reduce Pregnancy Rate in Women Undergoing IVF − 18 days ago
• Reduced Testosterone Tied to Endocrine-disrupting Chemical Exposure − 18 days ago
• Mayo Clinic Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline − 18 days ago
• The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: 2 Out of Every 5 Americans Expected to Develop Type 2 Diabetes During Their Lifetime − 19 days ago
 
Endocrinology

USC Eye Institute Study Finds African-Americans at Higher Risk for Diabetic Vision Loss


12 days ago − University of Southern California - Health Sciences
• New DNA Test for Diagnosing Diseases Linked to Childhood Blindness − 11 days ago
• Researchers Pinpoint Most Common Causes of Dangerous Eye Infection Post Surgery And Trauma − 12 days ago
• USC Eye Institute Study Shows Native American Ancestry a Risk Factor for Eye Disease − 11 days ago
• UK Dyslexia Charities Should Give Balanced View on Expensive Lenses to Improve Reading − 12 days ago
• Proteins Critical to Wound Healing Identified − 14 days ago
 
Dermatology
Photodynamic Therapy Vs. Cryotherapy for Actinic Keratoses

5 days ago − The JAMA Network Journals
Bottom Line: Photodynamic therapy (PDT, which uses topical agents and light to kill tissue) appears to better clear actinic keratoses (AKs, a common skin lesion caused by sun damage) at three months after treatment than cryotherapy (which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze lesions). Author: Gayatri Patel, M.D., M.P.H., of the University of California Davis Medical Center, in Sacramento, and colleagues. …
• Patient, Tumor Characteristics for High-mitotic Rate Melanoma − 12 days ago
• Study Identifies Protein That Helps Prevent Active Tuberculosis in Infected Patients − 12 days ago
• FDA-approved Drug Restores Hair in Patients with Alopecia Areata − 14 days ago
• Acute Psychological Stress Promotes Skin Healing in Mice − 25 days ago
• Research Led by Temple's Chair of Dermatology: Pain And Itch May Be Signs of Skin Cancer − 1 months ago
 
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