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Medicine & Health »RSS
Falls in Months Before Surgery Are Common in Adults of All Ages

1 hours ago − Washington University in St. Louis
In a large study of 15,000 adults undergoing elective surgery, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that falling up to six months before an operation is common and often causes serious injuries -- not only in elderly patients but across all age groups. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients was slightly higher than those who were age 65 or older. …
• Certain Occupations Linked to Increased Bladder Cancer Risk − 1 hours ago
• New Insight into the Most Common Genetic Cause of ALS And FTD − 1 hours ago
• Researchers Discover Powerful Defense Against Free Radicals That Cause Aging, Disease − 1 hours ago
• Risk of Blindness from Spine Surgery Down Significantly − 1 hours ago
• New Research May Help to Develop Effective Pain Killers − 1 hours ago
• Review Article Compared Over-the-counter Nasal Dilators − 1 hours ago
• BRCA1 Mutations Linked to Increased Risk of Serous, Serous-like Endometrial Cancer − 1 hours ago
• Scientific Breakthrough May Limit Damage Caused by Heart Attacks − 1 hours ago
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Simple Screening Tool Helps Determine COPD Risk
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Wearable Technology Gets Good Ratings from Plastic Surgeons
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Certain Red Flags Indicate an Increased Need for Intensive Care among Patients with Asthma
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Total Face Transplant in Patient with Severe Burns - Team Outlines Surgical Approach
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Allergy-causing 'Bad Guy' Cells Unexpectedly Prove Life-saving in C. Difficile

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Rice University Lab Runs Crowd-sourced Competition to Create 'Big Data' Diagnostic Tools

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Saved by the Sun

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Little to No Association Between Butter Consumption And Chronic Disease Or Total Mortality
BOSTON (Embargoed until 2 PM EDT, June 29, 2016)--Butter consumption was only weakly associated with total mortality, not associated with cardiovascular disease, and slightly inversely associated (protective) with diabetes,…
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Testosterone Therapy Improves Sexual Interest, Function in Older Men
Washington, DC--Older men with low libido and low testosterone levels showed more interest in sex and engaged in more sexual activity when they underwent testosterone therapy, according to a…
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Cancer, Oncology

How Will Genomics Enter Day-to-day Medicine?


1 hours ago − Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
• BRCA1 Mutations Linked to Increased Risk of Serous, Serous-like Endometrial Cancer − 1 hours ago
• Scientific Breakthrough May Limit Damage Caused by Heart Attacks − 1 hours ago
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• Certain Occupations Linked to Increased Bladder Cancer Risk − 1 hours ago
• Incidence of Cancer in Patients with Large Colorectal Polyps Lower Than Previously Thought − 1 hours ago
 
AIDS, HIV

Sharing Treatment Decisions Challenges Doctors And Parents of Young Children with Autism


9 days ago − Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
• To Improve Global Health, Experts Call for a Standard List of Essential Diagnostic Tests − 18 hours ago
• Unproven Claims Run Rampant in E-cigarette Business − 3 days ago
• NIH-led Effort Uses Implementation Science to Reduce Mother-to-child HIV Transmission − 1 hours ago
• The Lancet: Transgender Rights Critical for the Health of 25 Million Transgender People Worldwide − 13 days ago
• Study Underscores Ongoing Need for HIV Safety Net Program − 13 days ago
• The Social Life of Health Information − 15 days ago
 
Stroke, Cerebral Infarction
Rate of Decline of Cardiovascular Deaths Slows in US

18 hours ago − The JAMA Network Journals
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, and colleagues examined recent national trends in death rates due to all cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease (HD), stroke, and cancer, and also evaluated the gap between mortality rates from HD and cancer. …
• New Neuroendovascular Technique Shows Promise in Stroke Patients with Large-vessel Clots − 18 hours ago
• Kaiser Permanente Study: National Rates of Death Due to Heart Disease, Stroke Leveling Off − 18 hours ago
• Men May Face High Lifetime Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death − 18 hours ago
• Genetically Inherited High Cholesterol Increases Long-term Risks of CHD & Strok − 18 hours ago
• New Devices Causing 'Paradigm Shift' in Stroke Care − 3 days ago
• New Study Helps Determine Which Older Adults Might Need Help Taking Medications − 7 days ago
 
Surgery
Falls in Months Before Surgery Are Common in Adults of All Ages

1 hours ago − Washington University in St. Louis
In a large study of 15,000 adults undergoing elective surgery, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that falling up to six months before an operation is common and often causes serious injuries -- not only in elderly patients but across all age groups. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients was slightly higher than those who were age 65 or older. …
• Risk of Blindness from Spine Surgery Down Significantly − 1 hours ago
• Review Article Compared Over-the-counter Nasal Dilators − 1 hours ago
• BRCA1 Mutations Linked to Increased Risk of Serous, Serous-like Endometrial Cancer − 1 hours ago
• Chemoradiotherapy After Surgery for GC Shows Similar Outcomes to Post-operative Chemotherapy − 1 hours ago
• Wearable Technology Gets Good Ratings from Plastic Surgeons − 18 hours ago
• Total Face Transplant in Patient with Severe Burns - Team Outlines Surgical Approach − 18 hours ago
 
Infectious Disease

NIH-led Effort Uses Implementation Science to Reduce Mother-to-child HIV Transmission


1 hours ago − Fogarty International Center
• Early Diagnosis, Effective Therapy Vital for Treatment of Deadly Invasive Aspergillosis − 1 hours ago
• Allergy-causing 'Bad Guy' Cells Unexpectedly Prove Life-saving in C. Difficile − 18 hours ago
• To Improve Global Health, Experts Call for a Standard List of Essential Diagnostic Tests − 18 hours ago
• Saved by the Sun − 18 hours ago
• Zika Virus Infection May Be Prolonged in Pregnancy − 18 hours ago
 
Nutrition, Obesity

All Signs Point to Health: Arrows on Grocery Floors Increased the Proportion of Produce Spending


1 hours ago − Elsevier Health Sciences
• Nutrition Labels on Dining Hall Food: Are They Being Used? by Who? − 18 hours ago
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• Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Multiple Sclerosis − Yesterday
• Consumption of Omega-3s Linked to Lower Risk of Fatal Heart Disease − 3 days ago
 
Pharmaceutical

A Lesson from Fruit Flies


Yesterday − University of California - Santa Barbara
• Ovarian Cancer Study Uncovers New Biology − 18 hours ago
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• New Preclinical Study Indicates Vaccine to Prevent Zika Infection in Humans Is Feasible − Yesterday
• Lack of Voluntary Data Sharing from Industry-funded Clinical Trials − Yesterday
• Foot Wrap Offers Alternative to Medication for Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome − 2 days ago
 
Urology

Piping Hot Drinks May Lead to Cancer of the Esophagus


14 days ago − University of Southern California
• Experts Take Strong Stance on Testosterone Deficiency And Treatment − 9 days ago
• Screening Strategy May Predict Lethal Prostate Cancer Later in Life − 16 days ago
• Laser Ablation Becomes Increasingly Viable Treatment for Prostate Cancer − 20 days ago
• Survey Finds Why Most Men Avoid Doctor Visits − 20 days ago
• In Obese Prostate Cancer Patients, Robotic Surgery Reduces Risk of Blood Loss − 1 months ago
 
Obstetrics, Gynaecology
Fetal BPA Exposure in Mice Linked to Estrogen-related Diseases After Adolescence

13 days ago − Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Low levels of BPA exposure may be considered safe, but new research published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests otherwise. In the report, researchers from Yale show that the genome is permanently altered in the uterus of mice that had been exposed to BPA during their fetal development. These changes were found to mainly affect genes that are regulated by estrogen and are implicated in the formation of estrogen-related…
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• Latest Penn Studies of Personalized Cell Therapies Define Optimal Doses − 26 days ago
• Diabetes Drug Metformin Holds Promise for Cancer Treatment And Prevention − 26 days ago
 
Pathology

Monkey Study Shows Zika Infection Prolonged in Pregnancy


Yesterday − University of Wisconsin-Madison
• Incidence of Cancer in Patients with Large Colorectal Polyps Lower Than Previously Thought − 1 hours ago
• Protein Associated with Improved Survival in Some Breast Cancer Patients − 18 hours ago
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Psychiatry
Religious Service Attendance Associated with Lower Suicide Risk among Women

18 hours ago − The JAMA Network Journals
Women who attended religious services had a lower risk of suicide compared with women who never attended services, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. Suicide is among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. The major world religions have traditions prohibiting suicide. …
• Greenery in Neighborhoods May Reduce Adolescent Aggressive Behavior − Yesterday
• Anti-anxiety Medication Limits Empathetic Behavior in Rats − 2 days ago
• Gene Hunters Find Rare Inherited Mutations Linked to Bipolar Disorder − 2 days ago
• State Medical Home Initiative Slashes Healthcare Costs for Complex Medicaid Patients − 3 days ago
• Analysis of Genetic Repeats Suggests Role for DNA Instability in Schizophrenia − 6 days ago
 
Pediatrics

Scientific Breakthrough May Limit Damage Caused by Heart Attacks


1 hours ago − Sanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
• Educating Parents on Healthy Infant Sleep Habits May Help Prevent Obesity − 18 hours ago
• Monkey Study Shows Zika Infection Prolonged in Pregnancy − Yesterday
• Teaching an Old Drug New Tricks to Fight Cytomegalovirus − 2 days ago
• Drug Monitoring Programs Reduce Opioid Deaths: Study − 7 days ago
• What Does Zika Virus Mean for the Children of the Americas? − 9 days ago
 
Neurology
UGR Researchers Conduct Parkinson's Screening to Improve Early And Differential Diagnosis

Yesterday − University of Granada
A team of scientists at the University of Granada has used a next-generation genetic sequencing method and a technique known as "Sanger sequencing" to conduct a detailed genetic screening of patients in Granada suffering from Parkinson's disease. They conducted the study in collaboration with the Movement Disorders Unit from the Virgen de las Nieves and San Cecilio hospitals, as well as with researchers from the Institute of Neurology at…
• New Method to Grow And Transplant Muscle Stem Cells Holds Promise for Treatment of MD − Yesterday
• In First-ever Survey, 36% of Water Polo Players Report Concussions − 3 days ago
• Lower Levels of Coenzyme Q10 in Blood Associated with Multiple System Atrophy − 3 days ago
• New Devices Causing 'Paradigm Shift' in Stroke Care − 3 days ago
• Text Messaging with Smartphones Triggers a New Type of Brain Rhythm − 3 days ago
 
Cardiology

Device for Irregular Heartbeat May Be More Cost-effective Than Medication


13 days ago − Yale University
• Kaiser Permanente Study: National Rates of Death Due to Heart Disease, Stroke Leveling Off − 18 hours ago
• Inserting Stents Through the Wrist Reduces Bleeding, Death Rates in Heart Disease Patients − 18 hours ago
• New Electric Mesh Device Gives the Heart an Electromechanical Hug − Yesterday
• Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Under-appreciated Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death in Male Minority Athletes − 3 days ago
• Rate of Decline of Cardiovascular Deaths Slows in US − 18 hours ago
 
Radiology

Methylene Blue Shows Promise for Improving Short-term Memory


Yesterday − Radiological Society of North America
• Health-care Providers Do Not Fully Understand Cancer Risk from CT Scans − 6 days ago
• Tumor Cells Develop Predictable Characteristics That Are Not Random, Say Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers − 9 days ago
• Cerebral Microbleeds in MS Are Associated with Increased Risk for Disability − 13 days ago
• Age, Obesity, Dopamine Appear to Influence Preference for Sweet Foods − 14 days ago
• Pre-procedure Medication Regimen Could Lead to Less Hospital Time for Liver Cancer Patients − 20 days ago
 
Endocrinology

Shift Work Unwinds Body Clocks, Leading to More Severe Strokes


28 days ago − Texas A&M University
• Both Limited And Excess Sleep May Raise Diabetes Risk in Men − 18 hours ago
• The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Older Americans with Diabetes Living Longer Without Disability, US Study Shows − 17 days ago
• The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Mediterranean Diet High in Healthy Fat Does Not Lead to Weight Gain, According to Randomized Trial − 23 days ago
• Testosterone Therapy Improves Sexual Interest, Function in Older Men − 18 hours ago
• Premature Babies May Grow Up to Have Weaker Bones − 1 months ago
 
Endocrinology

Differences in How ALS Affects Eye And Limb Muscles Act as Clue


28 days ago − Umea University
• Nearly 10 Million Adults Found to Be Severely Nearsighted in the United States − 9 days ago
• Electric Fields Weaker in Slow-healing Diabetic Wounds − 13 days ago
• High-priced Drugs Used to Treat Diabetic Macular Edema Not Cost-effective − 20 days ago
• Risk of Blindness from Spine Surgery Down Significantly − 1 hours ago
• Study Identifies Risk Factors Associated with Eye Abnormalities in Infants with Presumed Zika Virus − 1 months ago
 
Dermatology
Partners of Patients with Melanoma Find New Cancers with Skin Exam Training

18 hours ago − The JAMA Network Journals
Skin-check partners of patients with melanoma effectively performed skin self-examinations and identified new melanomas as part of an effort to increase early detection of the skin cancer that can be fatal, according to the results of a clinical trial published online by JAMA Dermatology. …
• Pubic Hair Grooming Common among Some US Women − 18 hours ago
• Electric Fields Weaker in Slow-healing Diabetic Wounds − 13 days ago
• New Drug Clears Psoriasis in Clinical Trials − 20 days ago
• Early Detection, Smaller Cancer among Benefits of Skin Cancer Screening at PCP Visits − 22 days ago
• Healing Function of Sweat Glands Declines with Age − 27 days ago
 
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