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Gay Men's Bilateral Brains Better at Remembering Faces: York U Study

Published: June 22, 2010.
Released by York University  

TORONTO, June 22, 2010 – Gay men can recall familiar faces faster and more accurately than their heterosexual counterparts because, like women, they use both sides of their brains, according to a new study by York University researchers.


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nature
New Genetic Test Will Improve Biosecurity of Honey Bees Around the Globe
TORONTO, April 22, 2015 -- A genetic test that can prevent 'killer' bees from spreading around the world has been created in a research effort led by University of Sydney scholars jointly with York University scientists. "Our genetic test is highly accurate and considerably more sophisticated than the old tests that have a high tendency to misclassify hybrid bees," says Professor Amro Zayed in the department of Biology, Faculty of Science.

biology
Road Salt Guidelines Need Review to Protect Food Chain in Lakes: York U Study
TORONTO, April 9, 2015: Salt used for winter road maintenance in Canada could wipe out water flea populations that keep our lakes clear of algae and feed the fish, a recent York University study has revealed.

medicine
York U Study: Functional Decline in Women at Alzheimer's Risk Relates to Deteriorating Brain Wiring
TORONTO, March 30, 2015 - In their latest brain imaging study on women at risk for Alzheimer's disease, York University researchers have found deterioration in the pathways that serve to communicate signals between different brain regions needed for performing everyday activities such as driving a car or using a computer.

medicine
Organisms Can Keep Gene Expression in Check: York U Biologist
TORONTO, March 13, 2015 - York University researchers have learned how living beings can keep gene expression in check -- which might partly explain the uncontrolled gene expression found in many cancers. "Using yeast as a model organism, we studied the Tup1 protein, a negative regulator of gene expression," says Biology Professor Emanuel Rosonina, adding, "This protein binds to some genes and blocks their expression, helping to ensure genes that shouldn't be turned on remain inactive."

biology
York U Researchers Discover How Midbrain Map Continuously Updates Visuospatial Memory
TORONTO, Jan. 15, 2015 - On the upcoming Super Bowl Sunday, a lot of us will be playing arm-chair quarterback. After the snap, we might use our eyes to track a wide receiver as he runs toward an opening, all the while remembering the location of the star running back in case he breaks through on a rushing play. This natural ability to track one moving player but be ready to quickly look back toward another one sounds simple. But the science behind it is not so simple.

medicine
Significant Increase in Concussions among Ontario Children And Youth: York U Study
Toronto, Dec. 5, 2014 - The number of children and youth treated for concussions in both emergency departments and physician's offices in Ontario increased significantly between 2003 and 2010, with falls, hockey and skating injuries identified as the leading causes of pediatric concussion, according to a new joint study out of York University and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).

space
Ground-based Detection of Super-Earth Transit Paves Way to Remote Sensing of Exoplanets
TORONTO, December 1, 2014 - For the first time, a team of astronomers - including York University Professor Ray Jayawardhana - have measured the passing of a super-Earth in front of a bright, nearby Sun-like star using a ground-based telescope. The transit of the exoplanet 55 Cancri e is the shallowest detected from the ground yet, and the success bodes well for characterizing the many small planets that upcoming space missions are expected to discover in the next few years.

physics
Two New Baryon Particles Discovered in Agreement with York U Prediction
TORONTO, November 19, 2014 - Today an international team of researchers announced the discovery of two new particles in the baryon family, which makes them cousins of the familiar proton and neutron. The LHCb collaboration at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, used CERN's Large Hadron Collider to make these discoveries.

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