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Gay Men's Bilateral Brains Better at Remembering Faces: York U Study

Published: June 22, 2010.
By York University
http://www.yorku.ca

TORONTO, June 22, 2010 – Gay men can recall familiar faces faster and more accurately than their heterosexual counterparts because, like women, they use both sides of their brains, according to a new study by York University researchers.


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psychology
Reminding People of Their Religious Belief System Reduces Hostility: York U Research
TORONTO, Oct 15, 2014 – Few topics can prove more divisive than religion, with some insisting it promotes compassion, selflessness and generosity, and others arguing that it leads to intolerance, isolation and even violence. New research conducted at York University, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, may shed some light on religion's actual influence on believers – and the news is positive.
psychology
Pain Words Stand Out More for Those Experiencing It: York U Study
TORONTO, October 3, 2014 – Ache, agony, distress and pain draw more attention than non-pain related words when it comes to people who suffer from chronic pain, a York University research using state-of-the-art eye-tracking technology has found.
medicine
Perfectionism Is a Bigger Than Perceived Risk Factor in Suicide: York U Psychology Expert
TORONTO, September 25, 2014 – Perfectionism is a bigger risk factor in suicide than we may think, says York University Psychology Professor Gordon Flett, calling for closer attention to its potential destructiveness, adding that clinical guidelines should include perfectionism as a separate factor for suicide risk assessment and intervention.
medicine
Simple Test Can Help Detect Alzheimer's Before Dementia Signs Show: York U Study
TORONTO, Sept. 19, 2014 — York University researchers say a simple test that combines thinking and movement can help to detect heightened risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in a person, even before there are any telltale behavioural signs of dementia.
biology
York U Neuroscientists Decode Brain Maps to Discover How We Take Aim
TORONTO, Sept. 10, 2014 - Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance. But how much did her brain and its egocentric and allocentric functions help the American tennis star retain the cup?
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