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Gay Men's Bilateral Brains Better at Remembering Faces: York U Study

Published: June 22, 2010.
Released by York University  


TORONTO, June 22, 2010 – Gay men can recall familiar faces faster and more accurately than their heterosexual counterparts because, like women, they use both sides of their brains, according to a new study by York University researchers.


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biology
Small Offshore Oil Spills Put Seabirds at Risk: Industry Self-monitoring Failing
TORONTO, May 26, 2016 - Seabirds exposed to even a dime-sized amount of oil can die of hypothermia in cold-water regions, but despite repeated requests by Environment Canada, offshore oil operators are failing when it comes to self-monitoring of small oil spills, says new research out of York University.

medicine
Sugar Substitutes May Cut Calories, but No Health Benefits for Individuals with Obesity: York U
TORONTO, May 24, 2016 -- Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. "Our study shows that individuals with obesity who consume artificial sweeteners, particularly aspartame, may have worse glucose management than those who don't take sugar substitutes," says Professor Jennifer Kuk, obesity researcher in the School of Kinesiology and Health Science.

psychology
York U's OUCH Lab Pain Study Links Children's Fear of Needles to Parent Behaviour
TORONTO, May 18, 2016 - More than half of children are scared of needles; York University researchers have found a strong connection between this fear in anticipation of a jab and their parents' behaviour during infant vaccinations.

medicine
York U Invention Promises Rapid Detection of E. Coli in Water
TORONTO, May 17, 2016 - Tragedies like the E. coli outbreak in Ontario's Walkerton in May 2000 could be averted today with a new invention by researchers at York University that can detect the deadly contaminant in drinking water early.

medicine
International Experts Publish Guidelines for Cardiac Rehab in Developing Countries
TORONTO, May 16, 2016 - Life-saving cardiac rehab programs are not being offered in countries where heart disease is the biggest killer. A panel of experts has now released a statement recommending how all the key elements of these programs can be delivered in an affordable way, in the places where it is needed most.

psychology
Children, Youth Take Longer to Fully Recover from Concussion: York U Study
TORONTO, May 16, 2016 - York University concussion experts report that children and youth take longer to fully recover from a concussion than previously thought. After a concussion, young athletes usually rejoin their teams in a few weeks if they do not have any active symptoms. However, it might take up to two years to fully recover from the injury before they can play as skillfully as their teammates with no history of concussion, according Professor Lauren Sergio in the Faculty of Health.

nature
Citizen Scientists Collected Rare Ice Data, Confirm Warming Since Industrial Revolution
TORONTO, April 26, 2016 - In 1442, Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the freeze dates of a nearby lake, while in 1693 Finnish merchants started recording breakup dates on a local river. Together they create the oldest inland water ice records in human history and mark the first inklings of climate change, says a new report published today out of York University and the University of Wisconsin.

biology
York U Brain Study on Memory Delay Explains Visuomotor Mistakes
TORONTO, April 20, 2016 -- Who will win the women's singles tennis title at the 2016 Rio Olympics this August? That's a question recent York U brain research can help answer. The new study shows that when doing a visual task, neural activity in the frontal cortex initially reflects the visual goal accurately but errors accumulate during a memory delay, and further escalate during the final memory-to-motor transformation.

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