Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  FeedbackPublisher login 
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Biology >

Collaboration Encourages Equal Sharing in Children but Not in Chimpanzees

Published: July 20, 2011.
Released by Max-Planck-Gesellschaft  


Katharina Hamann with an international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Harvard University and the Michigan State University found that sharing in children that young is a pure collaborative phenomenon: when kids received rewards not cooperatively but as a windfall, or worked individually next to one another, they kept the majority of toys for themselves. One of humans' closest living relatives, chimpanzees, did not show this connection between sharing resources and collaborative efforts. …


Full Story »


More news from Max-Planck-Gesellschaft


biology
Urocortin-3: A Signaling Molecule for Making Friends
Meeting new people can be both stressful and rewarding. Research at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, reported today in Nature Neuroscience, suggests that a molecule involved in regulating stress in the brain may also help determine how willing we are to leave the safety of our social group and strike up new relationships.

biology
Neurons Form Synapse Clusters
The cerebral cortex resembles a vast switchboard. Countless lines carrying information about the environment, for example from the sensory organs, converge in the cerebral cortex. In order to direct the flow of data into meaningful pathways, the individual pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex act like miniature switchboard operators. Each cell receives information from several thousand lines. If the signals make sense, the line is opened, and the information is relayed onward. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried have…

biology
No Blood Vessels Without Cloche
The decade-long search by researchers worldwide for a gene, which is critical in controlling the formation of blood and blood vessels in the embryo, shows how fascinating science can be. It is more than 20 years since Didier Stainier, director at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim, discovered a zebrafish mutant named cloche. This mutant lacks development of both blood vessels and blood cells, and was, until now, a unique phenomenon. Now, his research group has succeeded…

biology
Sharper Than Living Matter Permits
Anyone who has ever taken a group photo will be familiar with the problem: If everyone is constantly running around, it's almost impossible to get a sharp photo. Cell biologists who want to visualize molecular processes inside cells face a similar challenge. The molecules dance about at high speed. Receptors at the cell surface move within milliseconds, while vesicles transport proteins in seconds. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund have now found a way to pinpoint the positions…

archaeology
Homo Erectus Walked as We Do
Fossil bones and stone tools can tell us a lot about human evolution, but certain dynamic behaviours of our fossil ancestors - things like how they moved and how individuals interacted with one another - are incredibly difficult to deduce from these traditional forms of paleoanthropological data. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, along with an international team of collaborators, have recently discovered multiple assemblages of Homo erectus footprints in northern Kenya that provide unique opportunities to understand…

biology
Messaging by Flow in the Brain
We have all bumped our heads at some point, and such incidents are usually harmless. This is thanks to fluid-filled chambers in our brain that offset minor knocks and jolts and provide padding for sensitive components of our nervous system. Cerebral fluid, however, has more than just a protective function: It removes cellular waste, supplies our nervous tissue with nutrients, and transports important messenger substances. How these messenger substances are actually being delivered to their destination in the brain, however, was unclear until…

biology
Female Bonobos Send Mixed Messages to Males
In several species of primates, males often discern when to mate with a female based on cyclical changes in the size and firmness of her sexual swelling - a visual signal of a female's probability to conceive. In a study of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, primatologist Pamela Heidi Douglas and colleagues investigated for the first time the relationship between ovarian hormones and sexual swellings in wild female bonobos. The likelihood that a female bonobo ovulates during her…

biology
Cells Send Out Stop Signs
Eph receptors and their partner proteins, the ephrins, are vital for intercellular communication. In the developing brain, they guide young neurons to the right partner cells by repulsion. They also play important roles in cell migration, regeneration, neurodegenerative diseases and the development of cancer. Until recently, scientists assumed that ephrin/Eph signal transmission could only occur through direct cell-cell contact. However, RĂ¼diger Klein and his team at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology have now shown that cells can also pack and release active…

Most Popular − Biology
© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Japanese Edition