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Like Fish on Waves: Electrons Go Surfing

Published: September 22, 2011.
By Ruhr-University Bochum
http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de

Physicists at the RUB, working in collaboration with researchers from Grenoble and Tokyo, have succeeded in taking a decisive step towards the development of more powerful computers. They were able to define two little quantum dots (QDs), occupied with electrons, in a semiconductor and to select a single electron from one of them using a sound wave, and then to transport it to the neighbouring QD. A single electron "surfs" thus from one quantum dot to the next like a fish on a…


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