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A New Theory Emerges for Where Some Fish Became 4-limbed Creatures

Published: December 28, 2011.
By University of Oregon
http://uonews.uoregon.edu

A small fish crawling on stumpy limbs from a shrinking desert pond is an icon of can-do spirit, emblematic of a leading theory for the evolutionary transition between fish and amphibians. This theorized image of such a drastic adaptation to changing environmental conditions, however, may, itself, be evolving into a new picture.


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