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Notre Dame Physicists Use Ion Beams to Detect Art Forgery

Published: January 20, 2012.
Released by University of Notre Dame  

University of Notre Dame nuclear physicists Philippe Collon and Michael Wiescher are using accelerated ion beams to pinpoint the age and origin of material used in pottery, painting, metalwork and other art. The results of their tests can serve as powerful forensic tools to reveal counterfeit art work, without the destruction of any sample as required in some chemical analysis.


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