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Hyperactivity in Brain May Explain Multiple Symptoms of Depression

Published: February 28, 2012.
Released by University of California - Los Angeles  

Most of us know what it means when it's said that someone is depressed. But commonly, true clinical depression brings with it a number of other symptoms. These can include anxiety, poor attention and concentration, memory issues, and sleep disturbances.


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More news from University of California - Los Angeles


technology
New Method of Quantum Entanglement Packs Vastly More Data in a Photon
A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are -- a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement. In previous studies, photons have typically been entangled by one dimension of their quantum properties -- usually the direction of their polarization.

medicine
UCLA Studies Identify Predictors of Depression And PTSD among African-Americans, Latinos
Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity.

medicine
Long-acting Antipsychotic Medication May Improve Treatment for Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization. Left untreated, the disease can cause a significant loss in quality of life, including unemployment and estrangement from loved ones. But many people with schizophrenia can control the disorder and live without symptoms for several years if they consistently take prescribed antipsychotic medication, typically a daily pill.

medicine
Brain Scan Can Predict Who Responds Best to Certain Treatment for OCD
Tens of millions of Americans -- an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population -- will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). Left untreated, OCD can be profoundly distressing to the patient and can adversely affect their ability to succeed in school, hold a job or function in society.

chemistry
UCLA Chemists Devise Technology That Could Transform Solar Energy Storage
The materials in most of today's residential rooftop solar panels can store energy from the sun for only a few microseconds at a time. A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks -- an advance that could change the way scientists think about designing solar cells. The findings are published June 19 in the journal Science. The new design is inspired by the way that plants generate energy through photosynthesis.

nature
Scientists Make New Estimates of the Deep Carbon Cycle
Over billions of years, the total carbon content of the outer part of the Earth -- in its upper mantle, crust, oceans, and atmospheres -- has gradually increased, scientists reported this month in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

space
UCLA-led NASA Mission Provides Closest Ever Look at Dwarf Planet Ceres
A NASA mission led by UCLA professor Christopher Russell has released new images of the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest asteroid between Mars and Jupiter. The photos were produced by the spacecraft Dawn, which is now observing Ceres from 2,700 miles above its surface; NASA has also produced a one-minute video animation that sheds new light on this mysterious and heavily cratered world.

psychology
Even When We're Resting, Our Brains Are Preparing Us to Be Social, UCLA Reports
Even when we're resting, our brains are preparing us to be social, UCLA psychologists report A new study by UCLA neuroscientists sheds light on why Facebook is such a popular diversion for people who feel like taking a break. Their research shows that even during quiet moments, our brains are preparing us to be socially connected to other people.

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