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Hyperactivity in Brain May Explain Multiple Symptoms of Depression

Published: February 28, 2012.
By University of California - Los Angeles
http://www.newsroom.ucla.edu

Most of us know what it means when it's said that someone is depressed. But commonly, true clinical depression brings with it a number of other symptoms. These can include anxiety, poor attention and concentration, memory issues, and sleep disturbances.


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More news from University of California - Los Angeles


medicine
Study Provides More Evidence That Sleep Apnea Is Hurting Your Brain
Employing a measure rarely used in sleep apnea studies, researchers at the UCLA School of Nursing have uncovered evidence of what may be damaging the brain in people with the sleep disorder — weaker brain blood flow.
medicine
UCLA Biologists Delay the Aging Process by 'Remote Control'
UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. Working with fruit flies, the life scientists activated a gene called AMPK that is a key energy sensor in cells; it gets activated when cellular energy levels are low.
biology
In Sync And in Control?
In the aftermath of the Aug. 9 shooting of an 18-year-old African American man by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, much of the nation's attention has been focused on how law enforcement's use of military gear might have inflamed tensions. But what if the simple act of marching in unison — as riot police routinely do — increases the likelihood that law enforcement will use excessive force in policing protests?
psychology
In Our Digital World, Are Young People Losing the Ability to Read Emotions?
Children's social skills may be declining as they have less time for face-to-face interaction due to their increased use of digital media, according to a UCLA psychology study. UCLA scientists found that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other digital screen did substantially better at reading human emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who continued to spend hours each day looking at their electronic devices.
biology
Scientists Discover How 'Jumping Genes' Help Black Truffles Adapt to Their Environment
Black truffles, also known as Périgord truffles, grow in symbiosis with the roots of oak and hazelnut trees. In the world of haute cuisine, they are expensive and highly prized.
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Highways of the Brain: High-cost And High-capacity
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Researchers Use Brain-injury Data to Map Intelligence in the Brain
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Do You Obsess over Your Appearance? Your Brain Might Be Wired Abnormally
By University of California - Los Angeles
Body dysmorphic disorder is a disabling but often misunderstood psychiatric condition in which people perceive themselves to be disfigured and ugly, even though they look normal to others. New …
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7/12/13 
★★★ 

Daydreaming Simulated by Computer Model
By Washington University School of Medicine
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Scientists Use 'Optogenetics' to Control Reward-seeking Behavior
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(Embargoed) CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – Using a combination of genetic engineering and laser technology, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have manipulated brain wiring responsible …
Ruthazer 
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No Room for Inaccuracy in the Brain
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Dr. Ed Ruthazer is a mapmaker but, his landscape is the developing brain - specifically the neuronal circuitry, which is the network of connections between nerve cells. His research …
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