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Protein Discovery Could Switch Off Cardiovascular Disease

Published: March 12, 2012.
Released by Queen Mary, University of London  

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Surrey have found a protein inside blood vessels with an ability to protect the body from substances which cause cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online in the journal Cardiovascular Research, have revealed the protein protein pregnane X receptor (PXR) can switch on different protective pathways in the blood vessels.


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medicine
Changing Stem Cell Structure May Help Fight Obesity
The research, conducted at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), found that a slight regulation in the length of primary cilia, small hair-like projections found on most cells, prevented the production of fat cells from human stem cells taken from adult bone marrow.

nature
Cold-blooded Animals Grow Bigger in the Warm on Land, but Smaller in Warm Water
The findings strongly support the idea that reduced oxygen availability in water causes aquatic animals to reduce their body size much more with warming than those on land.

psychology
Scientists Tackle Issue of How to Get a First Date in a Digital World
An online profile name beginning with letters A-M is as important as an attractive photo and fluent headline when it comes to being successful in the world of online dating, according to scientists. Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have taken an evidence-based approach to the ancient pursuit of dating, by carrying out a systematic review on converting online contact into a first date.

biology
'Stressed' Young Bees Could Be the Cause of Colony Collapse
Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is a major threat to bee colonies around the world and affects their ability to perform vital human food crop pollination. It has been a cause of urgent concern for scientists and farmers around the world for at least a decade but a specific cause for the phenomenon has yet to be conclusively identified.

biology
Tropical Wasps Attack Intruders with Unfamiliar Faces
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London in collaboration with the University of Florence, have discovered that a species of tropical wasps can memorize the faces of members of their colony and will attack any individual with an unfamiliar face. These wasps can also recognize the smell of their nestmates, but pay more attention to the unique facial patterns in their species when considering whether an individual is friend or foe.

medicine
New 'Microcapsules' Have Potential to Repair Damage Caused by Osteoarthritis
A new 'microcapsule' treatment delivery method developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) could reduce inflammation in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and reverse damage to tissue. The research was funded by Arthritis Research UK and the AO Foundation.

medicine
Hope for Muscular Dystrophy Patients: Harnessing Gene Helps Repair Muscle Damage
Researchers have successfully improved the ability of muscle to repair itself - by artificially increasing levels of the BMI1 gene in the muscle-specific stem cells of mice with muscular dystrophy. The BMI1 gene has been previously linked to the body's ability to regenerate tissue cells in areas such as blood or skin.

medicine
Testing for Bovine Tuberculosis Is More Effective Than Badger Culls
Modelling produced by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has found that the only effective potential Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are badger culling, cattle testing, controlling cattle movement, and ceasing the practice of housing farm cattle together during winter. The modelling found that in a region containing about 1.5m cows of which 3000 to 15,000 might have TB, badger culling could account for a reduction of 12 in the number of infected cattle. While reducing the testing interval by one…

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