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Protein Discovery Could Switch Off Cardiovascular Disease

Published: March 12, 2012.
By Queen Mary, University of London
http://www.qmul.ac.uk

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Surrey have found a protein inside blood vessels with an ability to protect the body from substances which cause cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online in the journal Cardiovascular Research, have revealed the protein protein pregnane X receptor (PXR) can switch on different protective pathways in the blood vessels.


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More news from Queen Mary, University of London


medicine
Scientists Identify Potential Cause for 40% of Pre-term Births
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and UCL (University College London) have identified what they believe could be a cause of pre-term premature rupture of the fetal membrane (PPROM), which accounts for 40 per cent of pre-term births, and is the main reason for infant death world-wide.
medicine
Scientists Make Major Breakthrough in Understanding Leukemia
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered mutations in genes that lead to childhood leukaemia of the acute lymphoblastic type – the most common childhood cancer in the world. The study was conducted amongst children with Down's syndrome – who are 20-50 times more prone to childhood leukaemias than other children – and involved analysing the DNA sequence of patients at different stages of leukaemia.
medicine
Scientists Uncover Stem Cell Behavior of Human Bowel for the First Time
For the first time, scientists have uncovered new information on how stem cells in the human bowel behave, revealing vital clues about the earliest stages in bowel cancer development and how we may begin to prevent it.
medicine
Aspirin: Scientists Believe Cancer Prevention Benefits Outweigh Harms
New research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) reveals taking aspirin can significantly reduce the risk of developing – and dying from – the major cancers of the digestive tract, i.e. bowel, stomach and oesophageal cancer.
medicine
Researchers Determine Why Tendons Break Down with Age
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have identified differences in the proteins present in young and old tendons, in new research that could guide the development of treatments to stop tissue breakdown from occurring. Tendon structure in horses is similar to humans, and both face common injuries. The researchers used a horse model to undertake a thorough analysis of all the proteins and protein fragments present in healthy and injured tendons.
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