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Protein Discovery Could Switch Off Cardiovascular Disease

Published: March 12, 2012.
Released by Queen Mary, University of London  

Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Surrey have found a protein inside blood vessels with an ability to protect the body from substances which cause cardiovascular disease. The findings, published online in the journal Cardiovascular Research, have revealed the protein protein pregnane X receptor (PXR) can switch on different protective pathways in the blood vessels.


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