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Top > Psychology >

Sweden's Largest Facebook Study: A Survey of 1,000 Swedish Facebook Users

Published: April 2, 2012.
Released by University of Gothenburg  

The surveyed women spend an average of 81 minutes per day on Facebook, whereas men spend 64 minutes. Low educated groups and low income groups who spend more time on Facebook also report feeling less happy and less content with their lives. This relationship between time spent on Facebook and well-being is also salient for women, but not for men. These are some of the results of Sweden's largest Facebook study ever, a project led by Leif Denti, doctoral student of psychology at…


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