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Personality, Habits of Thought And Gender Influence How We Remember

Published: April 10, 2012.
Released by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign  


We all have them – positive memories of personal events that are a delight to recall, and painful recollections that we would rather forget. A new study reveals that what we do with our emotional memories and how they affect us has a lot to do with our gender, personality and the methods we use (often without awareness) to regulate our feelings. The study appears in Emotion, a journal of the American Psychological Association.


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