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Sex, Tools And Chromosomes

Published: April 12, 2012.
Released by University of California - Davis  

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a key tool that helps sperm and eggs develop exactly 23 chromosomes each. The work, which could lead to insights into fertility, spontaneous miscarriages, cancer and developmental disorders, is published April 13 in the journal Cell.


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