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Sex, Tools And Chromosomes

Published: April 12, 2012.
Released by University of California - Davis  


Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a key tool that helps sperm and eggs develop exactly 23 chromosomes each. The work, which could lead to insights into fertility, spontaneous miscarriages, cancer and developmental disorders, is published April 13 in the journal Cell.


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medicine
Hepatitis Virus-like Particles as Potential Cancer Treatment
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Zebra Stripes Not for Camouflage, New Study Finds
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Newly Identified Enzyme May Be the Culprit in Pierce's Disease Grapevine Damage
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biology
First Brain Scans of Sea Lions Give Clues to Strandings
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technology
UC Davis Scientists Demonstrate DNA-based Electromechanical Switch
A team of researchers from the University of California, Davis and the University of Washington have demonstrated that the conductance of DNA can be modulated by controlling its structure, thus opening up the possibility of DNA's future use as an electromechanical switch for nanoscale computing. Although DNA is commonly known for its biological role as the molecule of life, it has recently garnered significant interest for use as a nanoscale material for a wide-variety of applications.

medicine
Endangered Foxes on Catalina Island Get Promising Treatment to Reduce Ear Tumors
Until recently, endangered foxes on California's Catalina Island were suffering from one of the highest prevalences of tumors ever documented in a wildlife population, UC Davis scientists have found. But treatment of ear mites appears to be helping the wild animals recover. Roughly half of adult foxes examined between 2001 and 2008 had tumors in their ears, with about two-thirds of those malignant, according to a UC Davis study published this month in the journal PLOS ONE.

medicine
Guided Ultrasound Plus Nanoparticle Chemotherapy Cures Tumors in Mice
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