Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  FeedbackPublisher login 
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Biology >

Jurassic Pain: Giant 'Flea-like' Insects Plagued Dinosaurs 165 Million Years Ago

Published: May 1, 2012.
Released by Oregon State University  


CORVALLIS, Ore. – It takes a gutsy insect to sneak up on a huge dinosaur while it sleeps, crawl onto its soft underbelly and give it a bite that might have felt like a needle going in – but giant "flea-like" animals, possibly the oldest of their type ever discovered, probably did just that.


Full Story »


More news from Oregon State University


biology
Ocean Bacteria Are Programmed to Alter Climate Gases
CORVALLIS, Ore. - SAR11, the most abundant plankton in the world's oceans, are pumping out massive amounts of two sulfur gases that play important roles in the Earth's atmosphere, researchers announced today in the journal Nature Microbiology. "Everyone knows these gases by their smells", said Steve Giovannoni, a distinguished professor of microbiology in the College of Science at Oregon State University, and corresponding author of the study.

chemistry
Engineers Create a Better Way to Boil Water - with Industrial, Electronics Applications
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Engineers at Oregon State University have found a new way to induce and control boiling bubble formation, that may allow everything from industrial-sized boilers to advanced electronics to work better and last longer. Advances in this technology have been published in Scientific Reports and a patent application filed.

biology
'Eve' And Descendants Shape Global Sperm Whale Population Structure
NEWPORT, Ore. - Although sperm whales have not been driven to the brink of extinction as have some other whales, a new study has found a remarkable lack of diversity in the maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA within the species. In fact, the mitochondrial DNA from more than a thousand sperm whales examined during the past 15 years came from a single "Eve" sperm whale tens of thousands of years ago, the researchers say.

nature
Hydropeaking of River Water Levels Is Disrupting Insect Survival, River Ecosystems
CORVALLIS, Ore. - A group of researchers concluded today in a study in the journal BioScience that "hydropeaking" of water flows on many rivers in the West has a devastating impact on aquatic insect abundance.

nature
Forming Fogbows: Study Finds Limit on Evaporation to Ice Sheets, but That May Change
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Although the coastal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet are experiencing rapid melting, a significant portion of the interior of that ice sheet has remained stable - but a new study suggests that stability may not continue.

psychology
Working Longer May Lead to a Longer Life, New OSU Research Shows
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Working past age 65 could lead to longer life, while retiring early may be a risk factor for dying earlier, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.

nature
Coal-tar Based Sealcoats on Driveways, Parking Lots Far More Toxic Than Suspected
CORVALLIS, Ore. - The pavement sealcoat products used widely around the nation on thousands of asphalt driveways and parking lots are significantly more toxic and mutagenic than previously suspected, according to a new paper published this week by researchers from Oregon State University.

psychology
Culture, Crowding And Social Influence All Tied to Aggressive Driving Behavior
CORVALLIS, Ore. - A study of angry, competitive and aggressive driving suggests that these dangerous behaviors are becoming a worldwide phenomenon of almost epidemic proportions, and are a reflection of a person's surrounding culture, both on the road and on a broader social level.

Most Popular − Biology
© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Japanese Edition