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Biologists Turn Back the Clock to Understand Evolution of Sex Differences

Published: May 3, 2012.
Released by McGill University  


Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colours of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict – the battle between males and females over mating – is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females.


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