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Biologists Turn Back the Clock to Understand Evolution of Sex Differences

Published: May 3, 2012.
Released by McGill University  

Sex differences account for some of the most of the spectacular traits in nature: the wild colours of male guppies, the plumage of peacocks, tusks on walruses and antlers on moose. Sexual conflict – the battle between males and females over mating – is thought to be a particularly potent force in driving the evolution traits that differ in males and females.

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Youth Violence Undermines Social And Economic Development in Poorest Corners of the World
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Climate Change Adaptation in High Income Countries: Some Clear Progress
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Geophysics Could Slow Antarctic Ice Retreat
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Let Your Head Do the Talking
When people talk or sing, they often nod, tilt or bow their heads to reinforce verbal messages. But how effective are these head gestures at conveying emotions? Very effective, according to researchers from McGill University in Montreal. Steven R. Livingstone and Caroline Palmer, from McGill's Department of Psychology, found that people were highly accurate at judging emotions based on head movements alone, even in the absence of sound or facial expressions.

A New Way to Starve Lung Cancer?
Scientists have identified a new way to stop the growth of lung cancer cells, by blocking their ability to use alternative sources of nutrition. The discovery was made possible by identifying the metabolic programs used by cancer cells to fuel their growth. The findings point to possible new avenues for treating lung cancer, which is the second most common cancer and accounts for over one-quarter of all cancer-related deaths. The results of the study were published Oct. 15 in the journal Molecular Cell.

Different Types of Child Abuse: Similar Consequences
Emotional abuse may be as harmful as physical abuse and neglect. This finding led by a team of researchers at McGill complements previous imaging research showing that emotional and physical pain both activate the same parts of the brain. Different types of abuse, same consequences

The Father Effect
If you have diabetes, or cancer or even heart problems, maybe you should blame it on your dad's behaviour or environment. Or even your grandfather's. That's because, in recent years, scientists have shown that, before his offspring are even conceived, a father's life experiences involving food, drugs, exposure to toxic products and even stress can affect the development and health not only of his children, but even of his grandchildren.

American Placebo
MONTREAL (Oct. 6, 2015) - A new study finds that rising placebo responses may play a part in the increasingly high failure rate for clinical trials of drugs designed to control chronic pain caused by nerve damage. Surprisingly, however, the analysis of clinical trials conducted since 1990 found that the increase in placebo responses occurred only in trials conducted wholly in the U.S.; trials conducted in Europe or Asia showed no changes in placebo responses over that period.

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