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'Unzipped' Carbon Nanotubes Could Help Energize Fuel Cells And Batteries, Stanford Scientists Say

Published: May 28, 2012.
Released by Stanford University  


Multi-walled carbon nanotubes riddled with defects and impurities on the outside could replace some of the expensive platinum catalysts used in fuel cells and metal-air batteries, according to scientists at Stanford University. Their findings are published in the May 27 online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology.


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