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Why Does the Week Before Your Vacation Seem Longer When You're Going Far Away?

Published: July 17, 2012.
By University of Chicago Press Journals
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu

Consumer decision-making is affected by the relationship between time and spatial distance, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. "We often think about time in various contexts. But we do not realize how susceptible our judgment of time is to seemingly irrelevant factors like spatial distance," write authors B. Kyu Kim (University of Southern California), Gal Zauberman (Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania), and James R. Bettman (Duke University).


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Keywords

Time, Consumers, Spatial, Distance, Authors, Told, Realize, Post, Office, Moving, Making, Long, Impatient, Distances, Choices, Bookstore, …

Cluster Centroids (Superclass Keywords)

Consumers, Choice, Options, Authors, Purchase, Consumer, Option, Choices, Search, Write, Apartment, Decision, Distance, Visual, Assortment, Products, Reject, Product, Rent, Information, Iphone, Prefer, Process, Pursuit, Focus, Features, Selin, Decide, Alternatives, Bookstore, Making, Assortments, Business, Feelings, Large, Location, Decisions, Close, Conclude, Style, Choosing, Sony, Choose, Selection, Attention, …

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