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Bird Louse Study Shows How Evolution Sometimes Repeats Itself

Published: August 16, 2012.
By University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
http://www.uiuc.edu

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Birds of a feather flock together and – according to a new analysis – so do their lice.


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More news from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


medicine
Study: Many in US Have Poor Nutrition, with the Disabled Doing Worst
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.
biology
Flu at the Zoo And Other Disasters: Experts Help Animal Exhibitors Prepare for the Worst
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Here are three disaster scenarios for zoo or aquarium managers: One, a wildfire lunges towards your facility, threatening your staff and hundreds of zoo animals. Two, hurricane floodwaters pour into your basement, where thousands of exotic fish and marine mammals live in giant tanks. Three, local poultry farmers report avian influenza (bird flu) in their chickens, a primary source of protein for your big cats.
psychology
Less-numerate Investors Swayed by Corporate Report Presentation Effects
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Publicly traded corporations are increasingly publishing social responsibility reports for investors, who now consider such information alongside traditional financial data before investing in a company.
biology
Built-in Billboards: Male Bluefin Killifish Signal Different Things with Different Fins
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — They help fish swim, but fins also advertise a fish's social standing and health. In a new study, researchers report that for the male bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei), each colorful fin presents its own messages to other fish. Researchers report their findings in the journal Behavioral Ecology.
nature
Rivers Flow Differently over Gravel Beds, Study Finds
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — River beds, where flowing water meets silt, sand and gravel, are critical ecological zones. Yet how water flows in a river with a gravel bed is very different from the traditional model of a sandy river bed, according to a new study that compares their fluid dynamics. The findings establish new parameters for river modeling that better represent reality, with implications for field researchers and water resource managers.
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