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Grandmas Made Humans Live Longer

Published: October 24, 2012.
Released by University of Utah  


SALT LAKE CITY, Oct. 24, 2012 – Computer simulations provide new mathematical support for the "grandmother hypothesis" – a famous theory that humans evolved longer adult lifespans than apes because grandmothers helped feed their grandchildren.


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