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Research Finds Evidence of a 'Mid-life Crisis' in Great Apes

Published: November 19, 2012.
Released by University of Warwick  

Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.


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