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Research Finds Evidence of a 'Mid-life Crisis' in Great Apes

Published: November 19, 2012.
Released by University of Warwick  

Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.


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More news from University of Warwick


psychology
Research Links Premature Birth to Withdrawn Personality
New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism. The study was led by Professor Dieter Wolke at the department of psychology and Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick. The results showed that the adults born very preterm scored highly for displaying a socially withdrawn personality, indicated by autistic features, neuroticism, introversion and decreased risk taking.

medicine
Cell Structure Discovery Advances Understanding of Cancer Development
University of Warwick researchers have discovered a cell structure which could help scientists understand why some cancers develop. For the first time a structure called 'the mesh' has been identified which helps to hold together cells. This discovery, which has been published in the online journal eLife, changes our understanding of the cell's internal scaffolding.

medicine
Experts Call for More Understanding of Hospital Weekend Death Risk
Professor Richard Lilford and Dr Yen-Fu Chen of the University's Warwick Medical School, raised the issue following a study that states hospital weekend death risk is common in several developed countries - not just England Professor Lilford, said: "Understanding this is an extremely important task since it is large, at about 10% in relative risk terms and 0.4% in percentage point terms. This amounts to about 160 additional deaths in a hospital with 40,000 discharges per year.

medicine
Cancer Drug 49 Times More Potent Than Cisplatin
Based on a compound of the rare precious metal osmium and developed by researchers at the University of Warwick's Department of Chemistry and the Warwick Cancer Research Unit, FY26 is able to shut down a cancer cell by exploiting weaknesses inherent in their energy generation.

medicine
Infant Mortality Rates Could Be Lowered Through Improved Medicine Packaging Designs
The usage of key medicines in developing countries could be significantly increased through improved packaging appearance, a new study by the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Inc. (CHAI) and the University of Warwick finds. Infant dehydration due to diarrhoea results in 600,000 deaths annually in the developing world due to inappropriate or no treatment. Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) combats this dehydration.

space
Red Dwarf Burns Off Planet's Hydrogen Giving It Massive Comet-like Tail
A giant cloud escaping from a warm, Neptune-mass exoplanet is reported in this week's Nature. Depicted in an image by Mark Garlick and issued by the University of Warwick, it has been suggested that low-mass exoplanets orbiting close to their parent stars could have had some fraction of their atmospheres 'burnt off' by extreme irradiation from the star, but confident measures of such losses have been lacking until now.

biology
Self-awareness Not Unique to Mankind
Humans are unlikely to be the only animal capable of self-awareness, a new study has shown. Conducted by University of Warwick researchers, the study found that humans and other animals capable of mentally simulating environments require at least a primitive sense of self. The finding suggests that any animal that can simulate environments must have a form of self-awareness.

medicine
Research Shows Parental Behavior Not Affected by Stress And Anxiety of Premature Birth
The stress and worry of giving birth prematurely does not adversely affect a mother's parenting behaviour, according to researchers at the University of Warwick. Preterm children often require special care in the neonatal period including incubator care or assistance with breathing. Previous research has suggested that this stress, separation and an increased tendency for depression may impair a mother's parenting behaviour and adversely affect preterm childrens' long term development.

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