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Research Finds Evidence of a 'Mid-life Crisis' in Great Apes

Published: November 19, 2012.
Released by University of Warwick  

Chimpanzees and orangutans can experience a mid-life crisis just like humans, a study suggests. This is the finding from a new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, that set out to test the theory that the pattern of human well-being over a lifespan might have evolved in the common ancestors of humans and great apes.


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space
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psychology
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medicine
Adult IQ of Very Premature Babies Can Be Predicted by the Age of Two
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psychology
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medicine
Cell Structure Discovery Advances Understanding of Cancer Development
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medicine
Experts Call for More Understanding of Hospital Weekend Death Risk
Professor Richard Lilford and Dr Yen-Fu Chen of the University's Warwick Medical School, raised the issue following a study that states hospital weekend death risk is common in several developed countries - not just England Professor Lilford, said: "Understanding this is an extremely important task since it is large, at about 10% in relative risk terms and 0.4% in percentage point terms. This amounts to about 160 additional deaths in a hospital with 40,000 discharges per year.

medicine
Cancer Drug 49 Times More Potent Than Cisplatin
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medicine
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