Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  FeedbackPublisher login 
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Physics >

New Device Hides, on Cue, from Infrared Cameras

Published: November 26, 2012.
Released by Harvard University  


Cambridge, Mass. - November 26, 2012 - Now you see it, now you don't. A new device invented at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) can absorb 99.75% of infrared light that shines on it. When activated, it appears black to infrared cameras. Composed of just a 180-nanometer-thick layer of vanadium dioxide (VO2) on top of a sheet of sapphire, the device reacts to temperature changes by reflecting dramatically more or less infrared light.


Full Story »


More news from Harvard University


nature
Peering into the Amazon's Future
Harvard researchers are challenging the widely-held theory that climate change could cause Amazon forests to rapidly change from forests to savannah. A new model, based on the effect of water stress on individual trees, suggests the change would be a gradual transition from high-biomass forests to low-biomass forests and woodland ecosystems. The study is described in a recently published paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

biology
Autism Breakthrough
In a discovery that could offer valuable new insights into understanding, diagnosing and even treating autism, Harvard scientists for the first time have linked a specific neurotransmitter in the brain with autistic behavior.

biology
A Focus on Fairness
Fairness may be a key component of human civilization, allowing us to share valuable resources, but does it develop the same way, and at the same pace, across all human cultures? A new Harvard study suggests that the answer may be no.

technology
Dive of the RoboBee
In 1939, a Russian engineer proposed a "flying submarine" -- a vehicle that can seamlessly transition from air to water and back again. While it may sound like something out of a James Bond film, engineers have been trying to design functional aerial-aquatic vehicles for decades with little success. Now, engineers may be one step closer to the elusive flying submarine.

physics
Super-slick Material Makes Steel Better, Stronger, Cleaner
Steel is ubiquitous in our daily lives. We cook in stainless steel skillets, ride steel subway cars over steel rails to our offices in steel-framed building. Steel screws hold together broken bones, steel braces straighten crooked teeth, steel scalpels remove tumors. Most of the goods we consume are delivered by ships and trucks mostly built of steel.

medicine
Identifying Problems with National Identifiers
In a pair of experiments that raise questions about the use of national identifying numbers, Harvard researchers have shown that Resident Registration Numbers (RRN) used in South Korea can be decrypted to reveal a host of personal information.

biology
Attacking Acute Myeloid Leukemia
A team of Harvard researchers and other collaborators led by Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Matthew Shair has demonstrated that a molecule isolated from sea sponges and later synthesized in Shair's lab, can halt the growth of cancerous cells and could open the door to a new treatment for leukemia. The study is described in a September 28th paper in Nature.

biology
A Whale of a Tale
To some, it may not come as a surprise to learn that the great whales are carnivores, feeding on tiny shrimp-like animals such as krill. Moreover, it might not be surprising to find that the microbes that live in whale guts -the so-called microbiome- resemble those of other meat eaters. But scientists now have evidence that the whales' microbiome shares traits with creatures not known to eat meat - cows.

© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Japanese Edition