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USC, Oxford Researchers Find High Fructose Corn Syrup-global Prevalence of Diabetes Link

Published: November 27, 2012.
Released by University of Southern California - Health Sciences  


LOS ANGELES AND OXFORD, U.K.— A new study by University of Southern California (USC) and University of Oxford researchers indicates that large amounts of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in national food supplies across the world may be one explanation for the rising global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and resulting higher health care costs.


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