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Super-fine Sound Beam Could One Day Be an Invisible Scalpel

Published: December 20, 2012.
Released by University of Michigan  


ANN ARBOR—A carbon-nanotube-coated lens that converts light to sound can focus high-pressure sound waves to finer points than ever before. The University of Michigan engineering researchers who developed the new therapeutic ultrasound approach say it could lead to an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery.


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Researchers Discover Powerful Defense Against Free Radicals That Cause Aging, Disease
ANN ARBOR--Free radicals cause cell damage and death, aging and disease, and scientists have sought new ways to repel them for years. Now, a new University of Michigan study outlines the discovery of a protein that acts as a powerful protectant against free radicals. Ironically, the protein is activated by excessive free radicals. Human mutations of the gene for this protein are previously known to cause a rare, neurodegenerative disease.

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Political Pitfalls in Handling Ebola May Carry over to Zika
ANN ARBOR --If the United States responds to Zika the way it did to Ebola -- and early indications are that in many ways it is -- the country can expect missteps brought about by a lack of health care coordination and a lot of political finger pointing, according to an analysis by the University of Michigan.

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Study Shows Women Lack Confidence in Maternity Care Providers
ANN ARBOR--Every woman who has ever had a baby shower has had to sit through the gruesome war stories about labor and childbirth. A new University of Michigan study shows that women are even more afraid of childbirth than previously thought--and are as concerned about their health care providers and their place of birth as they are about pain or complications.

medicine
U-M Study Highlights Multiple Factors of ADHD Medication Use
ANN ARBOR -- Youth who take Ritalin, Adderall or other stimulant medications for ADHD over an extended period of time early in life are no more at risk for substance abuse in later adolescence than teens without ADHD, according to a University of Michigan study. The findings also show that teens who start using stimulant medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder for a short time later in adolescence -- during middle or high school -- are at high risk of substance use..

medicine
Google Searches for 'Chickenpox' Reveal Big Impact of Vaccinations
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psychology
Small Talk: Electronic Media Keeping Kids from Communicating with Parents
ANN ARBOR--It happens in many households. Kids are tapping on their cell phones or are preoccupied by their favorite TV show as their parents ask them a question or want them to do a chore. It's not just teens caught up in electronic media, but also preschoolers. In fact, there is little mother-child dialogue or conversation while children ages 3 to 5 are using media, such as TV, video games and mobile devices, according to a new University of Michigan study.

biology
Oldest Well-documented Blanding's Turtle Recaptured at U-M Reserve at Age 83
ANN ARBOR -- A female Blanding's turtle believed to be at least 83 years old was captured at a University of Michigan forest reserve this week. Researchers say it is the oldest well-documented Blanding's turtle and one of the oldest-known freshwater turtles.

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New Evidence That Humans Settled in Southeastern US Far Earlier Than Previously Believed
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