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Super-fine Sound Beam Could One Day Be an Invisible Scalpel

Published: December 20, 2012.
Released by University of Michigan  


ANN ARBOR—A carbon-nanotube-coated lens that converts light to sound can focus high-pressure sound waves to finer points than ever before. The University of Michigan engineering researchers who developed the new therapeutic ultrasound approach say it could lead to an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery.


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biology
Call of the Wild: Male Geladas Captivate Females with Moans, Yawns
ANN ARBOR -- For female gelada monkeys, a grunt from a male primate won't suffice to get her attention. The call of the wild must involve moans, wobbles or yawns to entice these females, according to a new University of Michigan study involving the Ethiopian mammals.

medicine
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physics
Flexible Film May Lead to Phone-sized Cancer Detector
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medicine
Magic Mold: Food Preservative Kills Cancer Cells, Superbugs
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nature
Asian Carp Could Cause Some Lake Erie Fish to Decline, Others to Increase
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physics
Turning Rice Farming Waste to Useful Silica Compounds
The researcher who developed the process says it could save approximately six tons of carbon emissions per ton of silica compounds produced. He estimates the cost of the technique to be 90 percent less than the current process, with virtually no carbon footprint. Developed by Richard Laine, a professor of materials science and engineering, the new technique is believed to be the first simple, inexpensive chemical method for producing high-purity silica compounds from agricultural waste.

medicine
Unhealthy Choices Cost Company Health Care Plans Billions of Dollars
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Heat Radiates 10,000 Times Faster at the Nanoscale
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