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Super-fine Sound Beam Could One Day Be an Invisible Scalpel

Published: December 20, 2012.
Released by University of Michigan  

ANN ARBOR—A carbon-nanotube-coated lens that converts light to sound can focus high-pressure sound waves to finer points than ever before. The University of Michigan engineering researchers who developed the new therapeutic ultrasound approach say it could lead to an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery.


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More news from University of Michigan


medicine
New Views of Enzyme Structures Offer Insights into Metabolism of Cholesterol, Other Lipids
ANN ARBOR--With the aid of X-ray crystallography, researchers at the University of Michigan have revealed the structures of two closely related enzymes that play essential roles in the body's ability to metabolize excess lipids, including cholesterol.

technology
Digital Games And Learning: Study Finds Helpful Features, Gaps
ANN ARBOR--A new report on how teachers use video games in classrooms identifies features they find most useful to track student learning, as well as gaps where better tools could help link games more closely to the curriculum.

biology
Molecular Evidence for the Loss of 3 Basic Tastes in Penguins
ANN ARBOR--A University of Michigan-led study of penguin genetics has concluded that the flightless aquatic birds lost three of the five basic vertebrate tastes--sweet, bitter and the savory, meaty taste known as umami--more than 20 million years ago and never regained them. Because penguins are fish eaters, the loss of the umami taste is especially perplexing, said study leader Jianzhi "George" Zhang, a professor in the U-M Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

nature
Geoengineering Report: Scientists Urge More Research on Climate Intervention
ANN ARBOR--Deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, while necessary, may not happen soon enough to stave off climate catastrophe. So, in addition, the world may need to resort to so-called geoengineering approaches that aim to deliberately control the planet's climate. That's according to a National Research Council committee that today released a pair of sweeping reports on climate intervention techniques.

medicine
Study Shows Tamiflu Gets Patients Back on Their Feet Faster, Reduces Flu Complications
ANN ARBOR--Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of antiviral drugs to help treat influenza, in a year when the available vaccine is not a good match for the current strain. Now, new evidence about a popular antiviral--often criticized as ineffective--shows that it can alleviate symptoms and prevent respiratory complications.

chemistry
Spiky 'Hedgehog Particles' for Safer Paints, Fewer VOC Emissions
ANN ARBOR--A new process that can sprout microscopic spikes on nearly any type of particle may lead to more environmentally friendly paints and a variety of other innovations. Made by a team of University of Michigan engineers, the "hedgehog particles" are named for their bushy appearance under the microscope. Their development is detailed in a study published in the Jan. 29 issue of Nature.

physics
'Bulletproof' Battery: Kevlar Membrane for Safer, Thinner Lithium Rechargeables
ANN ARBOR--New battery technology from the University of Michigan should be able to prevent the kind of fires that grounded Boeing 787 Dreamliners in 2013. The innovation is an advanced barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery. Made with nanofibers extracted from Kevlar, the tough material in bulletproof vests, the barrier stifles the growth of metal tendrils that can become unwanted pathways for electrical current.

medicine
Trust Your Gut: E. Coli May Hold One of the Keys to Treating Parkinson's
ANN ARBOR--E. coli usually brings to mind food poisoning and beach closures, but researchers recently discovered a protein in E. coli that inhibits the accumulation of potentially toxic amyloids--a hallmark of diseases such as Parkinson's.

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