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Some Minority Students May Fare Better Than Whites When Working Part Time, New Research Finds

Published: January 24, 2013.
Released by American Psychological Association  

WASHINGTON - African-American and Hispanic students may be less likely than non-Hispanic white students to hold a job during the school year, but when they do, they tend to work somewhat longer hours and seem less likely to see their grades suffer than non-Hispanic white students with jobs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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