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Put Me In, Coach! How Trained Literacy Coaches Can Improve Student Reading Comprehension

Published: January 25, 2013.
Released by University of Pittsburgh  


PITTSBURGH—The language and reading comprehension skills of low-income upper elementary-school students—especially English-language learners—can improve markedly if trained literacy coaches engage teachers in conducting interactive text discussions with students, according to a three-year University of Pittsburgh study.


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biology
Study of Enzymatic Chemical Reactions May Indicate How the First Cells Formed Colonies
A novel investigation of how enzymatic reactions can direct the motion and organization of microcapsules may point toward a new theory of how protocells - the earliest biological cells - could have organized into colonies and thus, could have ultimately formed larger, differentiated structures.

biology
Just Made a Bad Decision?
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technology
Enzymatic Engines
PITTSBURGH (Feb. 25, 2016) ... Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, along with collaborators at Penn State University's Chemistry Department, have discovered a novel way of utilizing the chemical reactions of certain enzymes to trigger self-powered mechanical movement.

chemistry
Pitt Researchers Developing Sponge-like Material to More Efficiently Store Natural Gas
Although compressed natural gas represents a cleaner and more efficient fuel for vehicles, its volatile nature requires a reinforced, heavy tank that stores the gas at high pressure and therefore limits vehicle design. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering are utilizing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to develop a new type of storage system that would adsorb the gas like a sponge and allow for more energy-efficient storage and use.

technology
Hybrid Material Presents Potential for 4-D-printed Adaptive Devices
PITTSBURGH--Combining photo-responsive fibers with thermo-responsive gels, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and Clemson University have modeled a new hybrid material that could reconfigure itself multiple times into different shapes when exposed to light and heat, allowing for the creation of devices that not only adapt to their environment, but also display distinctly different behavior in the presence of different stimuli.

biology
Pitt Researcher Lands the Cover of Developmental Cell by Uncovering an Evolutionary Secret
PITTSBURGH--How did the elephant get its trunk? Or the turtle its shell? How, in general, did the seemingly infinite diversity of complex animal forms on our planet arise? The scientific pursuit of how such "evolutionary novelties" come about is one of the big mysteries that biologists are trying to tease apart. The University of Pittsburgh's Mark Rebeiz and colleagues provide some answers in a paper published today in the journal Developmental Cell.

biology
Pitt Researchers Developing a Novel Way to Identify Pathogens
PITTSBURGH--There are plenty of ways in the lab to determine which bug is bugging you when you're sick. The University of Pittsburgh's Xinyu Liu, Sanford Asher, and colleagues may have found a faster method.

medicine
Pitt, Drexel, And NIH Team Up to Study Persistence of Ebola Virus in Wastewater
PITTSBURGH--The historic outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa that began in March 2014 and has killed more than 11,000 people since, has raised new questions about the resilience of the virus and tested scientists' understanding of how to contain it. The latest discovery by a group of microbial risk-assessment and virology researchers suggests that the procedures for disposal of Ebola-contaminated liquid waste might underestimate the virus' ability to survive in wastewater.

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