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No More 'Empty Nest:' Middle-aged Adults Face Family Pressure on Both Sides

Published: January 25, 2013.
Released by Oregon State University  

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The "empty nest" of past generations, in which the kids are grown up and middle-aged adults have more time to themselves, has been replaced in the United States by a nest that's full – kids who can't leave, can't find a job and aging parents who need more help than ever before. According to a new study by researchers at Oregon State University, what was once a life stage of new freedoms, options and opportunities has largely disappeared.


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Introverts Could Shape Extroverted Co-workers' Career Success, OSU Study Shows
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Introverted employees are more likely to give low evaluations of job performance to extroverted co-workers, giving introverts a powerful role in workplaces that rely on peer-to-peer evaluation tools for awarding raises, bonuses or promotions, new research shows.

medicine
New Technology Tracks Carcinogens as They Move Through the Body
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers for the first time have developed a method to track through the human body the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, as extraordinarily tiny amounts of these potential carcinogens are biologically processed and eliminated.

nature
No Laughing Matter: Nitrous Oxide Rose at End of Last Ice Age
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas that doesn't receive as much notoriety as carbon dioxide or methane, but a new study confirms that atmospheric levels of N2O rose significantly as the Earth came out of the last ice age and addresses the cause.

nature
Greenhouse Gases Linked to African Rainfall
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Scientists may have solved a long-standing enigma known as the African Humid Period - an intense increase in cumulative rainfall in parts of Africa that began after a long dry spell following the end of the last ice age and lasting nearly 10,000 years.

chemistry
Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Used for Energy Storage Products
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Chemists and engineers at Oregon State University have discovered a fascinating new way to take some of the atmospheric carbon dioxide that's causing the greenhouse effect and use it to make an advanced, high-value material for use in energy storage products.

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Matched 'Hybrid' Systems May Hold Key to Wider Use of Renewable Energy
CORVALLIS, Ore. - The use of renewable energy in the United States could take a significant leap forward with improved storage technologies or more efforts to "match" different forms of alternative energy systems that provide an overall more steady flow of electricity, researchers say in a new report.

biology
Lionfish Analysis Reveals Most Vulnerable Prey as Invasion Continues
CORVALLIS, Ore. - If you live in lionfish territory in the Atlantic Ocean, the last thing you want to be is a small fish with a long, skinny body, resting by yourself at night, near the bottom of the seafloor. If so, your chances of being gobbled up by a lionfish increase by about 200 times.

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Self-regulation Intervention Boosts School Readiness of At-risk Children, Study Shows
An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study from Oregon State University shows.

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