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Class Project Inspires Research Article in Ecology

Published: April 9, 2013.
Released by Virginia Institute of Marine Science  


A study that began as a class project among graduate students at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science is now a peer–reviewed research article in Ecology, the flagship journal of the Ecological Society of America. The article, "Physiological effects of diet mixing on consumer fitness: a meta-analysis," is co-authored by VIMS graduate students Jonathan Lefcheck, Matt Whalen, Theresa Davenport, and Josh Stone, along with VIMS Professor J. Emmett Duffy.


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