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UCLA Study Suggests Iron Is at Core of Alzheimer's Disease

Published: August 20, 2013.
Released by University of California - Los Angeles  

Alzheimer's disease has proven to be a difficult enemy to defeat. After all, aging is the No. 1 risk factor for the disorder, and there's no stopping that. Most researchers believe the disease is caused by one of two proteins, one called tau, the other beta-amyloid. As we age, most scientists say, these proteins either disrupt signaling between neurons or simply kill them. Now, a new UCLA study suggests a third possible cause: iron accumulation.


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UCLA Chemists Devise Technology That Could Transform Solar Energy Storage
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Scientists Make New Estimates of the Deep Carbon Cycle
Over billions of years, the total carbon content of the outer part of the Earth -- in its upper mantle, crust, oceans, and atmospheres -- has gradually increased, scientists reported this month in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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UCLA-led NASA Mission Provides Closest Ever Look at Dwarf Planet Ceres
A NASA mission led by UCLA professor Christopher Russell has released new images of the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest asteroid between Mars and Jupiter. The photos were produced by the spacecraft Dawn, which is now observing Ceres from 2,700 miles above its surface; NASA has also produced a one-minute video animation that sheds new light on this mysterious and heavily cratered world.

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Even When We're Resting, Our Brains Are Preparing Us to Be Social, UCLA Reports
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medicine
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