Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care >

UCLA Study Suggests Iron Is at Core of Alzheimer's Disease

Published: August 20, 2013.
Released by University of California - Los Angeles  

Alzheimer's disease has proven to be a difficult enemy to defeat. After all, aging is the No. 1 risk factor for the disorder, and there's no stopping that. Most researchers believe the disease is caused by one of two proteins, one called tau, the other beta-amyloid. As we age, most scientists say, these proteins either disrupt signaling between neurons or simply kill them. Now, a new UCLA study suggests a third possible cause: iron accumulation.

Full Story »

More news from University of California - Los Angeles

UCLA Physicists Determine 3-D Positions of Individual Atoms for the First Time
Atoms are the building blocks of all matter on Earth, and the patterns in which they are arranged dictate how strong, conductive or flexible a material will be. Now, scientists at UCLA have used a powerful microscope to image the three-dimensional positions of individual atoms to a precision of 19 trillionths of a meter, which is several times smaller than a hydrogen atom.

Keeping Gut Bacteria in Balance Could Help Delay Age-related Diseases, UCLA Study Finds
Why do some people remain healthy into their 80s and beyond, while others age faster and suffer serious diseases decades earlier? New research led by UCLA life scientists may produce a new way to answer that question -- and an approach that could help delay declines in health. Specifically, the study suggests that analyzing intestinal bacteria could be a promising way to predict health outcomes as we age.

Completely Paralyzed Man Voluntarily Moves His Legs, UCLA Scientists Report
A 39-year-old man who had had been completely paralyzed for four years was able to voluntarily control his leg muscles and take thousands of steps in a "robotic exoskeleton" device during five days of training -- and for two weeks afterward -- a team of UCLA scientists reports this week. This is the first time that a person with chronic, complete paralysis has regained enough voluntary control to actively work with a robotic device designed to enhance mobility.

Jupiter-like Planet Discovered Outside Our Solar System
A planet 100 light-years away that resembles a young Jupiter has been discovered by an international team of astronomers that includes six UCLA scientists. The discovery is reported Aug. 13 in the online edition of the journal Science.

Kids, Teens Win When Mental Health Providers Team with Pediatricians, Family Doctors
For the past decade, cutting-edge health care providers and researchers have increasingly pushed to integrate care for mental health and substance use problems within primary medical care for children and adolescents. Their hope is that children and teens who suffer from mental and behavioral disorders would fare better if their pediatricians or family doctors took an active role in linking them with mental health care, particularly when these doctors team up with mental health clinicians to help meet the needs of their young…

How to Convince Vaccine Skeptics - And How Not To
Many people who are skeptical about vaccinating their children can be convinced to do so, but only if the argument is presented in a certain way, a team of psychologists from UCLA and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reported today. The research appears in the online early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Young Adults with Autism Show Improved Social Function Following UCLA Skills Program
Researchers at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA have found that a social skills program for high-functioning young adults with autism spectrum disorder significantly improved the participants' ability to engage with their peers.

Non-surgical Approach Helps People with Paralysis Voluntarily Move Their Legs
In a study conducted at UCLA, five men who had been completely paralyzed were able to move their legs in a rhythmic motion thanks to a new, noninvasive procedure that stimulates the spinal cord. It is believed to be the first time voluntary leg movements have ever been relearned in completely paralyzed patients without surgery. The results are reported in the Journal of Neurotrauma.

Related »

Alzheimer's: Newly Identified Protein Pathology Impairs RNA Splicing
Move over, plaques and tangles. Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine's Alzheimer's Disease Research Center have identified …
Stanford Scientists See Iron-containing Inflammatory Cells in Alzheimer's Brains
Examining post-mortem tissue from the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators identified what …
Study Reveals Link Between High Cholesterol And Alzheimer's Disease
ST. PAUL, Minn. – People with high cholesterol may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to …
Brain Imaging Differences in Infants at Genetic Risk for Alzheimer's
PROVIDENCE, R.I. Brown University — Researchers from Brown University and Banner Alzheimer's Institute have found that infants who carry …
Cholesterol Increases Risk of Alzheimer's And Heart Disease
AURORA, Colo. (April 15, 2013) – Researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome and the University of …
Gene Networks in Brains of Deceased Patients Reveal Potential Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease
Most information about the cause of Alzheimer's disease is based on studies from animal models. Now, a study published …
Discovery of Molecular Pathway of Alzheimer's Disease Reveals New Drug Targets
The discovery of the molecular pathway that drives the changes seen in the brains of Alzheimer's patients is reported …
Untangling Alzheimer's Disease
Plaques and tangles made of proteins are believed to contribute to the debilitating progression of Alzheimer's disease. But proteins …
AAAS 2015: New Alzheimer's Targets Via Proteomics
Allan Levey, MD, PhD, chair of neurology at Emory University School of Medicine and director of the Emory Alzheimer's …
More » 
© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Japanese Edition