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CU-Boulder-led Team Gets First Look at Diverse Life Below Rare Tallgrass Prairies

Published: October 31, 2013.
By University of Colorado at Boulder
http://www.colorado.edu/news

America's once-abundant tallgrass prairies—which have all but disappeared—were home to dozens of species of grasses that could grow to the height of a man, hundreds of species of flowers, and herds of roaming bison.


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More news from University of Colorado at Boulder


psychology
Natural-terrain Schoolyards Reduce Children's Stress, Says Colorado University-Boulder Study
Playing in schoolyards that feature natural habitats and trees and not just asphalt and recreation equipment reduces children's stress and inattention, according to a University of Colorado Boulder study.
nature
CU, Old Dominion Team Finds Sea Level Rise in Western Tropical Pacific Anthropogenic
A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.
psychology
No Evidence That California Cellphone Ban Decreased Accidents, Says Colarado University Boulder Researcher
In a recent study, a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder found no evidence that a California ban on using hand-held cellphones while driving decreased the number of traffic accidents in the state in the first six months following the ban.
biology
CU-Boulder-led Team Identifies Fossils of Tiny, Unknown Hedgehog
Meet perhaps the tiniest hedgehog species ever: Silvacola acares. Its roughly 52-million-year-old fossil remains were recently identified by a University of Colorado Boulder-led team working in British Columbia.
biology
New Study Involving CU-Boulder Tells the Tale of a Kangaroo's Tail
Kangaroos may be nature's best hoppers. But when they are grazing on all fours, which is most of the time, their tail becomes a powerful fifth leg, says a new study.
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Soil 
3/25/14 
Understanding Plant-soil Interaction Could Lead to New Ways to Combat Weeds
By University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences
URBANA, Ill. – Using high-powered DNA-based tools, a recent study at the University of Illinois identified soil microbes that negatively affect ragweed and provided a new understanding of the …
Dormancy 
12/12/11 
★★ 
Spring's Rising Soil Temperatures See Hormones Wake Seeds from Their Winter Slumber
By University of Warwick
Dormant seeds in the soil detect and respond to seasonal changes in soil temperature by changing their sensitivity to plant hormones, new research by the University of Warwick has …
Bacterial 
7/29/10 
Some Trees 'Farm' Bacteria to Help Supply Nutrients
By American Society for Microbiology
Some trees growing in nutrient-poor forest soil may get what they need by cultivating specific root microbes to create compounds they require. These microbes are exceptionally efficient at turning …
Plants 
7/17/12 
Glyphosate-resistant 'Superweeds' May Be Less Susceptible to Diseases
By Purdue University
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Scientists searching for clues to understand how superweeds obtain resistance to the popular herbicide glyphosate may have been missing a critical piece of information, a …
Harrington 
4/2/10 
Study Reveals That Logging Debris Suppresses Development of an Invasive Competitor, Scotch Broom
By USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station
PORTLAND, Ore. –April 2, 2010. Countless studies and reports exist describing how a landscape is impacted after logging Douglas-fir: What is the impact on the soil? Should one leave …
Smoke 
2/28/14 
Smoke in the Water: Understanding the Effects of Smoke Compounds on Seed Germination
By American Journal of Botany
Although seemingly destructive, wildfires help to maintain biodiversity and are an important element of many ecosystems throughout the world. Not only do fires discourage non-native and invasive species from …
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