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2 Y Genes Can Replace the Entire Y Chromosome for Assisted Reproduction in Mice

Published: November 21, 2013.
Released by University of Hawaii at Manoa  


The Y chromosome is a symbol of maleness, present only in males and encoding genes important for male reproduction. But live mouse offspring can be generated with assisted reproduction using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes: the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y.


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