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UT Arlington Research May Unlock Enzyme's Role in Disease

Published: January 3, 2014.
Released by University of Texas at Arlington  

A UT Arlington chemist doing National Science Foundation-funded research on enzymes that regulate human biology has uncovered characteristics that could be used to identify predisposition to conditions such as heart disease, diabetic ulcers and some types of cancer.


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More news from University of Texas at Arlington


nature
New Study Assesses Risks of Extreme Weather to North Texas Roads, Runways
ARLINGTON, Texas -- A new study by researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington finds a high likelihood that extreme storms and higher precipitation will lead to transportation disruption and widespread damage to roads, railways and airport runways in the Dallas-Fort Worth region by the end of the 21st century.

technology
Comprehensive New Study Provides Foundation for the Future of Digital Higher Education
ARLINGTON, Texas -- A new, comprehensive metastudy of the role technology plays in higher education urges universities of tomorrow to capitalize on technologies that effectively support student learning, to embrace blended learning environments, and to customize degree programs to serve the needs of students in a digital age.

nature
New Evidence Shows Carbon's Importance to Ocean Life's Survival 252 Million Years Ago
ARLINGTON, Texas -- A new study led by scientists with The University of Texas at Arlington demonstrates for the first time how elemental carbon became an important construction material of some forms of ocean life after one of the greatest mass extinctions in the history of Earth more than 252 million years ago.

medicine
Researchers Demonstrate Optogenetic Stimulation of the Brain to Control Pain
ARLINGTON, Texas -- A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. Samarendra Mohanty, an assistant professor of physics, leads the Biophysics and Physiology Lab in the UT Arlington College of Science. He is co-author on a paper published online Wednesday by the journal PLOS ONE.

medicine
UT Arlington Bio-analytical Chemist Receives NIH, UT System Funding for Protein Research
ARLINGTON, Texas -- A University of Texas at Arlington bio-analytical chemist exploring proteins, their structures and functions by using cutting-edge analytical instrumentation called mass spectrometry has received an Academic Research Enhancement Award from the National Institutes of Health. The $354,749 in funding will help in identifying host-defense protein interactions networks caused by environmental and external agents.

biology
UT Arlington Study Researches AT&T Stadium's Impact on Nearby Businesses
When businesses synchronized their operations around major events at the then-new AT&T Stadium, they experienced success, a study by management professors at The University of Texas at Arlington shows. The study also shows that businesses closer to the stadium that saw the stadium as a negative became paralyzed when trying to adapt to the changing economic environment.

biology
More Efficient, Sensitive Estrogen Detection Developed at UT Arlington
Scientists at the Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Texas at Arlington have collaborated to develop a new method for detecting trace amounts of estrogen in small samples that holds the potential to improve research into cancer and other diseases.

technology
Theater Arts Research Offers Insight for Designers, Builders of Robots
As an actress, producer, director and theatre arts lecturer at The University of Texas at Arlington, Julienne Greer knows the techniques that help draw people's deepest emotions to the surface. Now, she's building on her experience and research to help scientists and robotics engineers better understand the human experience so that they can build more responsive robots.

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