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YOLO: Aging And the Pursuit of Happiness

Published: February 11, 2014.
By University of Chicago Press Journals
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu

As human beings, we expend a great deal of time, money, and energy in the pursuit of happiness. From exotic travel to simply spending time with our grandchildren, the things that make us happy change as we age. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research explores the role of age on the happiness we receive from both the ordinary and the extraordinary experiences in our lives.


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Keywords

People, Experiences, Time, Life, Extraordinary, Examine, Authors, …

Cluster Centroids (Superclass Keywords)

Authors, Aficionados, Mindset, Experiences, Daily, Distribution, Churchgoers, Write, Tidiness, Church, Joneses, Lives, Regret, Experiential, Extraordinary, Wine, Maximizing, Disruptions, Places, Consumption, Compete, Movies, Constantly, Advertising, Misleading, Cope, People, Experience, Descriptors, Products, Homes, Find, Reread, Re-Consuming, Re-Consumption, Familiar, Messy, Life—Impacts, Age—And, Bhattacharjee, Amit, Self-Defining, Latour, Institution, Array, …

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