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Rabbits Kept Indoors Could Be Vitamin D Deficient

Published: April 9, 2014.
By University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
http://www.uiuc.edu

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Rabbits that remain indoors may suffer from a lack of vitamin D, researchers report in a new study. In rabbits kept as pets or used in laboratory studies, the deficiency could lead to dental problems, undermine their cardiovascular health, weaken their immune systems and skew scientific findings.


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