Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Nature & Earth >

Study Casts Doubt on Climate Benefit of Biofuels from Corn Residue

Published: April 21, 2014.
Released by University of Nebraska-Lincoln  

Lincoln, Neb., April 20, 2014 -- Using corn crop residue to make ethanol and other biofuels reduces soil carbon and can generate more greenhouse gases than gasoline, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change. The findings by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln team of researchers cast doubt on whether corn residue can be used to meet federal mandates to ramp up ethanol production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


Full Story »


More news from University of Nebraska-Lincoln


biology
UNL Researcher: More Infectious Diseases Emerging Because of Climate Change
Lincoln, Neb., Feb. 15, 2015 -- The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

nature
UNL Drillers Help Make New Antarctic Discoveries
Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 21, 2015 -- Using a hot-water drill and an underwater robotic vehicle designed, built and operated by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln engineering team, scientists have made new discoveries about Antarctica's geology and biology. In addition to new observations about how Antarctica's ice sheets are affected by rising temperatures, the expedition also uncovered a unique ecosystem of fish and invertebrates living in an estuary deep beneath the Antarctic ice.

biology
Study Puts New Perspective on Snake Evolution
Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 5, 2015 - Snakes may not have shoulders, but their bodies aren't as simple as commonly thought, according to a new study that could change how scientists think snakes evolved. Paleobiologists Jason Head of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and P. David Polly of Indiana University Bloomington found distinctions among snakes' vertebral bones that matched those found in the backbones of four-legged lizards.

biology
Biologist Gains Insight into Genetic Evolution of Birds
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 11, 2104 -- A University of Nebraska-Lincoln researcher has contributed to discoveries about bird evolution as part of a new study that sequenced the complete genomes of 45 avian species. Published Dec. 11 in the journal Science, the study found that avian genomes -- the complete archive of genetic material present in cells -- have exhibited surprisingly slow rates of evolution when compared with their mammalian counterparts.

biology
Scientists Identify Most Ancient Pinworm Yet Found
An egg much smaller than a common grain of sand and found in a tiny piece of fossilized dung has helped scientists identify a pinworm that lived 240 million years ago. It is believed to be the most ancient pinworm yet found in the fossil record. The discovery confirms that herbivorous cynodonts -- the ancestors of mammals -- were infected with the parasitic nematodes. It also makes it even more likely that herbivorous dinosaurs carried pinworms.

space
UNL Study Details Laser Pulse Effects on Electron Behavior
Lincoln, Neb., Nov. 26, 2014 -- By solving a six-dimensional equation that had previously stymied researchers, University of Nebraska-Lincoln physicists have pinpointed the characteristics of a laser pulse that yields electron behavior they can predict and essentially control. It's long been known that laser pulses of sufficient intensity can produce enough energy to eject electrons from their ultrafast orbits around an atom, causing ionization.

chemistry
Physicists And Chemists Work to Improve Digital Memory Technology
Lincoln, Neb., Nov. 24, 2104 -- The improvements in random access memory that have driven many advances of the digital age owe much to the innovative application of physics and chemistry at the atomic scale. Accordingly, a team led by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers has employed a Nobel Prize-winning material and common household chemical to enhance the properties of a component primed for the next generation of high-speed, high-capacity RAM.

psychology
Scientists Find Growing Consensus: Political Attitudes Derive from Body And Mind
Lincoln, Neb., July 31, 2014 -- Do people make a rational choice to be liberal or conservative? Do their mothers raise them that way? Is it a matter of genetics? Two political scientists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a colleague from Rice University say that neither conscious decision-making nor parental upbringing fully explain why some people lean left while others lean right.

Related »

Carbon 
5/6/10 
Ancient Leaves Help Researchers Understand Future Climate
Potential climate change caused by rising levels of carbon dioxide might be better understood by examining fossil plant remains …
Understanding 
1/7/11 
College Students Lack Scientific Literacy, Study Finds
EAST LANSING, Mich. — Most college students in the United States do not grasp the scientific basis of the …
Carbon 
9/5/13 

Deep-ocean Carbon Sinks
Dom 
10/1/12 
The Chemical Memory of Seawater
Water does not forget, says Prof. Boris Koch, a chemist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine …
Carbon 
3/13/14 
Understanding How Mountains And Rivers Make Life Possible
Favorable conditions for life on Earth are enabled in part by the natural shuttling of carbon dioxide from the …
Carbon 
3/16/12 
New Dataset Provides 40-year Record of Carbon Dioxide Accumulation in the Surface Ocean
The most comprehensive dataset of surface water carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the world's oceans and coastal seas is …
Co2 
11/21/11 
Climate Change Effect on Release of CO2 from Peat Far Greater Than Assumed
Climate change effect on release of CO2 from peat far greater than assumed Drought causes peat to release far …
More » 
 
© Newsline Group  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Mobile