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SDSC Resources, Expertise Used in Genomic Analysis of 115 Year-old Woman

Published: April 30, 2014.
Released by University of California - San Diego  

A team of researchers investigating the genome of a healthy supercentenarian since 2011 has found many somatic mutations – permanent changes in cells other than reproductive ones – that arose during the woman's lifetime. Led by Erik Sistermans and Henne Holstege from the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the team recently published its findings in the journal Genome Research as reported by GenomeWeb.


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medicine
The Media Is the Message: How Stem Cells Grow Depends on What They Grow Up In
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technology
Combining Computer Vision And Brain Computer Interface for Faster Mine Detection
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medicine
Patients with Gastrointestinal Tumors at Higher Risk of Other Cancers
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physics
Inanimate Beads Behave in Lifelike Ways
Scientists have created microbe-sized beads that can utilize energy in the environment to self-propel upstream by purely physical means. Life is hard to define, but metabolism, mobility and replication are three commonly agreed elements. The beads are not alive, but they meet two of these three requirements.

medicine
How to Reset a Diseased Cell
In proof-of-concept experiments, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine demonstrate the ability to tune medically relevant cell behaviors by manipulating a key hub in cell communication networks. The manipulation of this communication node, reported in this week's issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, makes it possible to reprogram large parts of a cell's signaling network instead of targeting only a single receptor or cell signaling pathway.

biology
Spinal Cord Axon Injury Location Determines Neuron's Regenerative Fate
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report a previously unappreciated phenomenon in which the location of injury to a neuron's communication wire in the spinal cord -- the axon -- determines whether the neuron simply stabilizes or attempts to regenerate. The study, published April 30 by Neuron, demonstrates how advances in live-imaging techniques are revealing new insights into the body's ability to respond to spinal cord injuries.

medicine
Boosting the Body's Natural Ability to Fight Urinary Tract Infections
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common, and widespread antibiotic resistance has led to urgent calls for new ways to combat them. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report that an experimental drug that stabilizes a protein called HIF-1alpha protects human bladder cells and mice against a major UTI pathogen. The drug might eventually provide a therapeutic alternative or complement to standard antibiotic treatment. …

medicine
Why Do Obese Men Get Bariatric Surgery Far Less Than Women?
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