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SDSC Resources, Expertise Used in Genomic Analysis of 115 Year-old Woman

Published: April 30, 2014.
Released by University of California - San Diego  

A team of researchers investigating the genome of a healthy supercentenarian since 2011 has found many somatic mutations – permanent changes in cells other than reproductive ones – that arose during the woman's lifetime. Led by Erik Sistermans and Henne Holstege from the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, the team recently published its findings in the journal Genome Research as reported by GenomeWeb.


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