Home  |  Top News  |  Most Popular  |  Video  |  Multimedia  |  News Feeds  |  Feedback
  Medicine  |  Nature & Earth  |  Biology  |  Technology & Engineering  |  Space & Planetary  |  Psychology  |  Physics & Chemistry  |  Economics  |  Archaeology
Top > Medicine, Health Care >

Damage Control: Recovering from Radiation And Chemotherapy

Published: May 1, 2014.
Released by University of California - San Diego  

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that a protein called beta-catenin plays a critical, and previously unappreciated, role in promoting recovery of stricken hematopoietic stem cells after radiation exposure.

Full Story »

More news from University of California - San Diego

Online E-cigarette Vendors Engage Customers Using Popular Internet Tools
First introduced in the United States in 2007, electronic cigarettes have risen dramatically in part because they are popularly considered safer and more socially acceptable than combustible cigarettes and because there are fewer restrictions on their purchase and use. A study by University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, points to aggressive online marketing tactics that make purchasing e-cigarettes easy for all ages.

Fatty Liver Disease And Scarring Have Strong Genetic Component
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say that hepatic fibrosis, which involves scarring of the liver that can result in dysfunction and, in severe cases, cirrhosis and cancer, may be as much a consequence of genetics as environmental factors. The findings are published online in the journal Gastroenterology.

Babies Time Their Smiles to Make Their Moms Smile in Return
Why do babies smile when they interact with their parents? Could their smiles have a purpose? In the Sept. 23 issue of PLOS ONE, a team of computer scientists, roboticists and developmental psychologists confirm what most parents already suspect: when babies smile, they do so with a purpose--to make the person they interact with smile in return.

Tiny Carbon-capturing Motors May Help Tackle Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels
Machines that are much smaller than the width of a human hair could one day help clean up carbon dioxide pollution in the oceans. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have designed enzyme-functionalized micromotors that rapidly zoom around in water, remove carbon dioxide and convert it into a usable solid form.

Down Syndrome Research Untangles Therapeutic Possibilities for Alzheimer's
More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of them, 400,000 also have Down syndrome. Both groups have similar looking brains with higher levels of the protein beta amyloid. In fact, patients with Down syndrome develop the abnormal protein at twice the rate. Results of a pilot study, published in the September issue of Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, confirms the pathogenic role of beta amyloid in dementia as seen in both AD and Down syndrome.

Targeted Drug Delivery with These Nanoparticles Can Make Medicines More Effective
Nanoparticles disguised as human platelets could greatly enhance the healing power of drug treatments for cardiovascular disease and systemic bacterial infections. These platelet-mimicking nanoparticles, developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are capable of delivering drugs to targeted sites in the body -- particularly injured blood vessels, as well as organs infected by harmful bacteria. Engineers demonstrated that by delivering the drugs just to the areas where the drugs were needed, these platelet copycats greatly increased the therapeutic effects of…

Hearts Build New Muscle with This Simple Protein Patch
An international team of researchers has identified a protein that helps heart muscle cells regenerate after a heart attack. Researchers also showed that a patch loaded with the protein and placed inside the heart improved cardiac function and survival rates after a heart attack in mice and pigs.

Study Shows Africanized Bees Continue to Spread in California
A study conducted by biologists at UC San Diego has found that the Africanized honey bee--an aggressive hybrid of the European honey bee--is continuing to expand its range northward since its introduction into Southern California in 1994.

Related »

Cross-country Collaboration Leads to New Leukemia Model
Eight years ago, two former Stanford University postdoctoral fellows, one of them still in California and the other at …
Could Sleeping Stem Cells Hold Key to Treatment of Aggressive Blood Cancer?
Scientists studying an aggressive form of leukaemia have discovered that rather than displacing healthy stem cells in the bone …
Diabetes Distresses Bone Marrow Stem Cells by Damaging Their Microenvironment
New research has shown the presence of a disease affecting small blood vessels, known as microangiopathy, in the bone …
Growth Factor Aids Stem Cell Regeneration After Radiation Damage
DURHAM, N.C. – Epidermal growth factor has been found to speed the recovery of blood-making stem cells after exposure …
Duke Research Team Identifies a Potent Growth Factor for Blood Stem Cells
DURHAM -- Duke Medicine researchers studying the interaction of blood stem cells and the niche where they reside have …
How Long Do Stem Cells Live?
LA JOLLA, Calif., March 1, 2011 – When patients receive a bone marrow transplant, they are getting a new …
Gene-modified Stem Cell Transplant Protects Patients from Toxic Side Effects of Chemotherapy
SEATTLE – For the first time, scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have transplanted brain cancer patients' own …
Gamma Interferon a Wake-up Call for Stem Cell Response to Infection
HOUSTON -- (June 10, 2010) – Most of the time, the body's blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells remain dormant, with …
Cedars-Sinai Study Sheds Light on Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Pancreatic Recovery
LOS ANGELES (Oct. 2, 2012) – Researchers at Cedars-Sinai's Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute have found that a blood vessel-building …
More » 
© Newsline Foundation  |  About  |  Privacy Policy  |  Feedback  |  Japanese Edition