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Damage Control: Recovering from Radiation And Chemotherapy

Published: May 1, 2014.
Released by University of California - San Diego  

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that a protein called beta-catenin plays a critical, and previously unappreciated, role in promoting recovery of stricken hematopoietic stem cells after radiation exposure.


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technology
Researchers Generate Tunable Photon-pair Spectrum Using Room-temperature Quantum Optics Silicon Chip
A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego have demonstrated a way to emit and control quantum light generated using a chip made from silicon--one of the most widely used materials for modern electronics. The UC San Diego researchers recently described their new device's performance online in the journal Nature Communications, available via Open Access .

biology
The Story of a Bizarre Deep-sea Bone Worm Takes an Unexpected Twist
The saga of the Osedax "bone-eating" worms began 12 years ago, with the first discovery of these deep-sea creatures that feast on the bones of dead animals. The Osedax story grew even stranger when researchers found that the large female worms contained harems of tiny dwarf males.

medicine
Obese Children's Brains More Responsive to Sugar
A new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine finds that the brains of obese children literally light up differently when tasting sugar. Published online in International Journal of Obesity, the study does not show a causal relationship between sugar hypersensitivity and overeating but it does support the idea that the growing number of America's obese youth may have a heightened psychological reward response to food.

biology
Cells Can Use Dynamic Patterns to Pluck Signals from Noise
Scientists have discovered a general principle for how cells could accurately transmit chemical signals despite high levels of noise in the system, they report in Science this week. A cell's response to outside chemical signals depends on its physiological state, which can fluctuate considerably. Amounts of different kinds of proteins within individual cells varies by as much as 25 percent.

technology
Researchers Demonstrate New Way to Plug 'Leaky' Light Cavities
San Diego, Calif., Dec. 10, 2014 -- Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have demonstrated a new and more efficient way to trap light, using a phenomenon called bound states in the continuum (BIC) that was first proposed in the early days of quantum wave mechanics.

physics
Physicists Explain Puzzling Particle Collisions
An anomaly spotted at the Large Hadron Collider has prompted scientists to reconsider a mathematical description of the underlying physics. By considering two forces that are distinct in everyday life but unified under extreme conditions like those within the collider and just after the birth of the universe, they have simplified one description of the interactions of elementary particles. Their new version makes specific predictions about events that future experiments at the LHC and other colliders should observe and could help to reveal…

biology
Typhoid Mary, Not Typhoid Mouse
The bacterium Salmonella Typhi causes typhoid fever in humans, but leaves other mammals unaffected. Researchers at University of California, San Diego and Yale University Schools of Medicine now offer one explanation -- CMAH, an enzyme that humans lack. Without this enzyme, a toxin deployed by the bacteria is much better able to bind and enter human cells, making us sick. The study is published in the Dec. 4 issue of Cell.

biology
Bioengineering Study Finds Two-cell Mouse Embryos Already Talking About Their Future
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered that mouse embryos are contemplating their cellular fates in the earliest stages after fertilization when the embryo has only two to four cells, a discovery that could upend the scientific consensus about when embryonic cells begin differentiating into cell types. Their research, which used single-cell RNA sequencing to look at every gene in the mouse genome, was published recently in the journal Genome Research. In addition, this group published a paper on analysis…

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Tuberculosis May Lurk in Bone Marrow Stem Cells of Infected Patients, Stanford Researchers Say
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Cedars-Sinai Study Sheds Light on Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Pancreatic Recovery
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Stem Cell Bodyguards
Hiding deep inside the bone marrow are special cells. They wait patiently for the hour of need, at which point these blood forming stem cells can proliferate and differentiate …
Cells 
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STANFORD, Calif. — A new, noninvasive technique for tracking stem cells after transplantation — developed by a cross-disciplinary team of radiologists, chemists, statisticians and materials scientists at the Stanford …
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Key to Immune System Disease Could Lie Inside the Cheek
Powerful new cells created by Cardiff University scientists from cheek lining tissue could offer the answer to disorders of the immune system. While the body's immune system protects …
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